Wednesday 12 May 2021 10:36 am

British-built Ferrari V12 restomod by RML breaks cover

UK engineering company RML Group has unveiled a new sports car, inspired by the classic 1959 Ferrari 250 GT SWB.

Called the RML Short Wheelbase, the new model ‘pays homage to the driving purity of supercars from the past, while offering occupants 21st century convenience’. It also integrates a ‘raft of modern features’, says RML, meaning owners don’t have to compromise on all those modern comforts.

RML Short Wheelbase
(RML Group)

These include electrically adjustable seats, navigation, air conditioning, cupholders and smartphone integration. All have been ‘artfully and discreetly’ integrated into the cabin, which can accommodate people up to 6ft 2in tall.

The car is powered by a genuine naturally aspirated Ferrari V12, displacing 5,474cc and producing 485hp. Drive is delivered to the rear wheels via a Ferrari six-speed manual gearbox with a traditional open gate. The 0-62mph sprint is dispatched in 4.1 seconds and top speed is ‘in excess of 185mph’.

RML Short Wheelbase
(RML Group)

RML says that while the car is larger than an original 250 GT SWB, its overall proportions remain faithful. Obvious design homages include the stacked rear lights, exposed fuel filler, front grille and vents behind the wheels.

Comparisons are likely to be made between the Short Wheelbase and the forthcoming GTO Engineering Squalo, given both are inspired by the 250 GT SWB. However, the Squalo is powered by a newly designed engine, rather than an existing Ferrari unit.

RML Short Wheelbase
(RML Group)

“Our emphasis has always been on capturing a more organic driving experience, with less intervention and more usable performance, while still making it comfortable and convenient enough for people to enjoy regularly on modern roads,” said Michael Mallock, chief executive of RML.

Just 30 examples of the Short Wheelbase are planned and the first arrive in October. Pricing hasn’t been announced yet, but don’t expect any change from £1 million.

Daniel Puddicombe writes for Motoring Research

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