Battersea retail search: This gorgeous image shows how the South Bank will look in 2023

 
Emma Haslett
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Some of the schemes given planning permission on the river bank near Battersea (Source: CBRE)

Battersea Power Station began the hunt for businesses to fill the redeveloped version of its 42-acre site last week, launching a global tour taking in Kuala Lumpur, New York, Dubai, Paris, Los Angeles, Milan, Tokyo, Beijing, Singapore, Hong Kong, Shanghai and Doha to find the right businesses.

The scale of Battersea itself is already massive: when it's finished in 2019, it will comprise more than 800 homes, 250 shops and restaurants and more than 1.62 million sq ft of office space.

But Battersea is only a part of a total overhaul of Nine Elms lane, the part of the South Bank around the power station which had, until recently, acted as London's "engine room", with a heady mix of warehouses, delivery depots, train stations and even the Covent Garden Flower Market. After its transformation is complete, the area will have a new American Embassy, 18,000 homes, a trendy New York-style "linear park" and even a new tube station.

Whatever your opinion on the changes, there's no denying it will be radical. Property services company CBRE has created an image showing all the new buildings given approval on the South Bank.

Double click or pinch to zoom in, then scroll or swipe along to see the full stretch of the South Bank. If you're on a mobile or tablet, swipe to the right of the image viewer to scroll down the page.

Going right from the Shard right, you can see: the Baby Shard, Borough Market, Tate Modern, Neo Bankside, the scalpel-like One Blackfriars, the South Bank Tower, the South Bank Centre, Doon Street Tower, the Shell Centre, the London Eye. Further on, there's a cluster of tall buildings including the circular Vauxhall Tower and the twin towers of One Nine Elms, New Covent Garden Market, the short, squat cube of the US Embassy, Berkeley Group's Linnear Park , and finally Battersea Power Station.

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