Saturday 30 July 2016 1:04 pm

Oxford vs Cambridge, Oxbridge vs Ivy League: Whose graduates earn the most


I write about M&A, deals, IPOs, private equity, asset management, media and a few other areas for City A.M. I also write news features and am always interested in interviewing and profiling high-profile business figures. I previously worked for Press Gazette and Mail Online.

I write about M&A, deals, IPOs, private equity, asset management, media and a few other areas for City A.M. I also write news features and am always interested in interviewing and profiling high-profile business figures. I previously worked for Press Gazette and Mail Online.

Follow William Turvill

Cambridge may have won this year’s men’s boat race.

But Oxford's alumni can boast a superior average salary, according to new research looking at graduates with two to six years of experience in work.

Salary benchmarking site Emolument.com found the average Oxford graduate earns £70,000 (including a £5,000 bonus), ahead of £68,000 from Cambridge (again with a £5,000 bonus).

Read more: Salaries and bonuses at London banks, ranked from best to worst

Unfortunately for both Oxbridge universities, though, the study compared them with the US’s Ivy League, leaving them far behind the likes of Harvard (£105,000, including an £8,000 bonus) and Brown (£96,000, including a £10,000 bonus).

In Oxford and Cambridge’s favour, of course, is the fact that fees amount to less. Harvard’s tuition fees, for instance, come to £34,000, Emolument.com found.

The research also found an advantage to degrees in science, with Ivy Leaguers earning five per cent more on average and Oxbridgers one per cent.

Read more: Want a job in banking? Go to these universities


And the advantage of being male was even more extreme. Ivy League men earned on average £135,000 – 33 per cent more than women on £91,000. And Oxbridge males were on £86,000 – 34 per cent more than females’ £57,000.

Alice Leguay, co-founder and chief operating officer of Emolument.com, said: ''Earnings are clearly higher in the US thanks in part to a strong bonus culture.

“The huge costs of high-end degrees however leaves students well out of pocket by the time they graduate.”

For the study, the website analysed 5,013 salaries from Oxbridge and Ivy League alumni.

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