Friday 8 October 2021 1:55 pm

Property of the Week: Lancer Square, a shiny new development on the edge of Kensington Gardens

At the Kensington High Street end of Kensington Church Street, Lancer Square, which has been in development for many years, saw its first residents move in this week. The show apartment is a four-bedroom, five-bathroom enclave on the fourth floor overlooking the development’s sunken garden, and I think I can safely say that £15m doesn’t go as far as it used to in London. 

It’s tranquil and stylish, of course, and is a discreet and elegant addition to the much-loved faded charms of Kensington Church Street. The ground floor will be retail, so locals might find a new restaurant or two to rival nearby favourite Clarke’s (instead of the Starbucks and Café Rouge which stood in this previous piazza). Open to all is Kensington’s newest mini garden square, maturely planted and home to sculptures and a water feature. It’s been designed as a focal point for residents to look down on from on high from their floor-to-ceiling windows, balcony or communal rooftop terrace.

As a boutique development of just 36 apartments (60 per cent sold, I’m told), the drop-off entrance is secluded, yet you are a stone’s throw from Wholefoods if you need to pop out for milk. Or you could get the concierge to do all those life-admin tasks because, as we know, the quality of the concierge is key to our happiness and, here, Rhodium has the keys.

The piece-de-resistance of the location is the cut-through to Kensington Gardens and all that green space on your doorstep. This particular perk is no doubt responsible for adding those many millions to the price. Lancer Square is on the site of the former kitchen gardens to Kensington Palace and then its barracks for the Royal Lancers. Buyers, I’m told, are people who are looking exclusively in Kensington, where they have roots, and call London home, although they are players on the global stage.

And so to the build. It is rare to find new stock in the Kensington Palace Conservation Area and Squire & Partners is the architect for the developer Bellworth. The look and feel is of calm refinement on a human scale, starting with the two-tone red brick referencing the palace. It’s a place to breathe and relax. The apartments all have a hallway so that you get a sense of “coming home” (or, if you are WFH, you have never left). A hallway also means no-one is exposed to visitors.

The use of American walnut for the joinery throughout the whole development is warm and reassuring and the choice of stone has been carefully considered – both dark and light marbles in the apartments and a stunning green artwork in the basement spa of resin infused with metals and pigments over many layers. The 1,700 sq ft spa has all the essentials: sauna, steam, whirlpool and a 20m pool as well as cardio room, treatment room, lounge, and a studio space where you might meet your personal trainer at the crack of dawn. 

The show flat, by 1508, has colours of sand, butter, and sage along with the neutrals – nothing too controversial. It’s simply prepared for the well-travelled owner to beautifully display their curated possessions and favourite pieces of art.

£ Lancer Square starts from £4.86m for a two-bedroom apartment through Knight Frank and Savills (lancersquare.co.uk)

At the Kensington High Street end of Kensington Church Street, Lancer Square, which has been in development for many years, saw its first residents move in this week. The show apartment is a four-bedroom, five-bathroom enclave on the fourth floor overlooking the development’s sunken garden, and I think I can safely say that £15m doesn’t go as far as it used to in London. 

It’s tranquil and stylish, of course, and is a discreet and elegant addition to the much-loved faded charms of Kensington Church Street. The ground floor will be retail, so locals might find a new restaurant or two to rival nearby favourite Clarke’s (instead of the Starbucks and Café Rouge which stood in this previous piazza). Open to all is Kensington’s newest mini garden square, maturely planted and home to sculptures and a water feature. It’s been designed as a focal point for residents to look down on from on high from their floor-to-ceiling windows, balcony or communal rooftop terrace.

As a boutique development of just 36 apartments (60 per cent sold, I’m told), the drop-off entrance is secluded, yet you are a stone’s throw from Wholefoods if you need to pop out for milk. Or you could get the concierge to do all those life-admin tasks because, as we know, the quality of the concierge is key to our happiness and, here, Rhodium has the keys.

The piece-de-resistance of the location is the cut-through to Kensington Gardens and all that green space on your doorstep. This particular perk is no doubt responsible for adding those many millions to the price. Lancer Square is on the site of the former kitchen gardens to Kensington Palace and then its barracks for the Royal Lancers. Buyers, I’m told, are people who are looking exclusively in Kensington, where they have roots, and call London home, although they are players on the global stage.

And so to the build. It is rare to find new stock in the Kensington Palace Conservation Area and Squire & Partners is the architect for the developer Bellworth. The look and feel is of calm refinement on a human scale, starting with the two-tone red brick referencing the palace. It’s a place to breathe and relax. The apartments all have a hallway so that you get a sense of “coming home” (or, if you are WFH, you have never left). A hallway also means no-one is exposed to visitors.

The use of American walnut for the joinery throughout the whole development is warm and reassuring and the choice of stone has been carefully considered – both dark and light marbles in the apartments and a stunning green artwork in the basement spa of resin infused with metals and pigments over many layers. The 1,700 sq ft spa has all the essentials: sauna, steam, whirlpool and a 20m pool as well as cardio room, treatment room, lounge, and a studio space where you might meet your personal trainer at the crack of dawn. 

The show flat, by 1508, has colours of sand, butter, and sage along with the neutrals – nothing too controversial. It’s simply prepared for the well-travelled owner to beautifully display their curated possessions and favourite pieces of art.

£ Lancer Square starts from £4.86m for a two-bedroom apartment through Knight Frank and Savills (lancersquare.co.uk)

Share