One Undershaft: Plans to build the City's tallest skyscraper and London's second highest building revealed

 
Kasmira Jefford
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One Undershaft will replace the 32-storey Aviva Building off Leadenhall Street

Plans to build the City’s tallest skyscraper and London's second highest building – rivalled only by the Shard – have been unveiled today.

Singapore-based developers Aroland Holdings are seeking planning permission to build a 73 storey tower at One Undershaft in the City, between the Leadenhall Building and 30 St Mary’s Axe.

Standing 309.6 metres tall, the scheme would dwarf its skyscraper neighbours and nearly match The Shard.

Read more: Every skyscraper planning application in London mapped

The proposed office scheme, which has been designed by architect Eric Parry, will also have a viewing platform higher than that of the Shard, and “London’s highest public restaurant” as well as shops and a public square on the ground linking St Andrew Undershaft and St Helen’s Bishopsgate churches.

Parry, who is also behind Generali’s 10 Fenchurch Avenue scheme, said: “One Undershaft will create more of the quality office space that is desperately needed in the capital and will reconnect the city’s tall building cluster with the public."

“Most skyscrapers are used Monday to Friday but 1 Undershaft will be used seven days a week, with the public able to enjoy the new public square, viewing platform and restaurant every day. It will be the jewel in the crown of the City of London and something we hope Londoners will be very proud of,” he added.

One Undershaft is also the latest in a raft of new towers being added to the City skyline including Lipton Rogers and Axa Real Estate's new 62-storey "vertical city" at 22 Bishopsgate, on the former Pinnacle site, and Brookfield Property Partners 37-storey tower at 100 Bishopsgate.

The 90,000 square metre building, which will replace the Aviva Building, will be able to accommodate 10,000 people and will have 1,500 bicycle spaces as well as new shower and changing facilities.

Its architects also seem to have taken the Walkie Talkie's sun scorching disaster on board, noting that "special fins included in the design will reduce solar glare".

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