If you are in an Olympic hotspot, get set now

Q&A: London 2012 TIME TO GET READY

Q. WE ARE IN AN OLYMPIC HOTSPOT AREA, BUT WE HAVE NO IDEA HOW OUR EMPLOYEES MAKE THEIR WAY TO AND FROM WORK. HOW SHOULD WE PROCEED TO FIND THIS OUT? AND WHEN?

A. During the Olympic and Paralympic Games next year, the transport network will be much busier than usual and businesses in Games hotspots (areas which will be severely affected during the Games) will be seriously impacted.

It is important to start working with your employees as early as possible. Simple actions can be put in place now to reduce the impact of the Games on your business and in particular your employees, to ensure your business continues to run smoothly in the run up to, and during, the Games.

The first thing you should do is an employee survey to understand how your employees currently travel, via: london2012.com/traveladviceforbusiness. Once you know your employees’ travel behaviour, you need to assess how your local area will be affected.

The toy shop Hamleys is conducting an employee survey in preparation for the Games. Its Regent Street and Kings Cross St Pancras stores are located in Games hotspots and transport around these areas will be severely impacted next summer. Information about how employees travel is informing its action plan to see it continues to operate smoothly in Games time.

Games hotspots can be identified on the affected area map here: london2012.com/traveladviceforbusiness. This includes details of temporary measures which will affect these areas, such as the Olympic Route Network, the delays people are likely to face and the busiest times and days during the Games. Data due to be released in November will show how services on all Tube, DLR, London Overground and key National Rail stations are expected to be affected. This includes information on a line-by-line, day-by-day basis during the Games, in intervals of 30 minutes.

Once you know how your employees will be affected, you can think about solutions. Consider flexible and remote working, as this is a viable option for many and will allow businesses to reduce non-essential staff travel. If flexible working is an option, make sure the technology to enable this is put in place well before next summer. Visitors or employees should be encouraged to avoid travelling during spectator peak times and should think about alternative ways to travel, such as by bike, bus or on foot.

Businesses should work with their employees as early as possible, as their journeys to and from work will be affected. For more advice, please visit: london2012.com/traveladviceforbusiness. It offers a wealth of information and businesses can sign up for regular updates to help prepare for the Games.

If you require additional support, over 50 free workshops are available to small and medium businesses with less than 200 employees in one location. These help small businesses prepare for travel disruption during the Games. Sector-specific workshops are also available to multi-site businesses with more than one site in a Games hotspot.

To register interest in either workshop, email keeponrunning@London2012.com