Outsourcer Mitie to step electric vehicle operation up a gear with 717 new cars and vans to enter fleet by 2020

 
Alex Daniel
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Go Ultra Low Electric Vehicle on charge on a London street
Mitie said it would install more than 800 charging points across the UK (Source: Getty)

Outsourcer Mitie’s shares rose this morning on the announcement it is to introduce electric vehicles into its fleet of cars and vans.


The facilities management and professional services company said one-fifth of its 3,587 so-called smaller vehicles would be electric by the end of 2020, a total of 717 vehicles.

Mitie said it would install more than 800 charging points at its offices across the UK and at “suitable” home addresses of its drivers.

City A.M. understands the cost of the transformation will be comparable to what the company already pays for standard vehicles, albeit over a longer, four-year timeframe.

It also said it was in discussions with suppliers to negotiate a deal for renewable energy, which it plans to make available to electric vehicle drivers, as well as using at its offices.


Drivers working for Mitie have been sent letters from the company saying that in future, they will be expected to take an electric company van wherever possible.

The company has already ordered 400 electric small vans and cars in a bid to phase out petrol and diesel vehicles. The first electric models on order include vehicles made by Nissan, Renault, Hyundai and Volkswagen.

Simon King, head of fleet and procurement at Mitie, said: “We want to drive change in our industry and this is an important step in the effort to combat climate change.

We have a large fleet which we want to ensure is as green and sustainable as possible and show other companies making the switch to electric vehicles is the right thing for their people, the planet and their pockets over the long term.

“We know this will be a challenge, but Mitie is determined to pioneer this transformation and we are keen to take our clients on the journey with us by supporting them to make similar moves for their own fleets.”

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