Google fined €100,000 in France for failing to "effectively uphold" the right to be forgotten

 
William Turvill
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Google has been fined €100,000 by the Commission Nationale de l'Informatique et des Libertes (Source: Getty)

Google has been fined €100,000 (£79,000) by the French data protection authority.

The fine has been made in relation to the so-called right to be forgotten law.

The Commission Nationale de l'Informatique et des Libertes (CNIL) said Google had not fully upheld the right because its scrubbing of results does not extend far enough.

Read more: Why the right to be forgotten is bad for business – and freedom

The CNIL said: "Only delisting on all of the search engine's extensions, regardless of the extension used or the geographic origin of the person performing the search, can effectively uphold this right."

The US web giant does not delist 'right to be forgotten' results from its non-European websites.

Read more: Why Europe’s “right to be forgotten” will prove an expensive mistake

The original right to be forgotten ruling was passed by the EU Court of Justice in May 2014.

It allows individuals to force the removal of links under certain search terms to website articles.

Google has been asked for comment.

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