Sunday 19 February 2017 3:12 pm

Watch: The moment SpaceX’s Falcon 9 rocket lands gracefully back on earth at historic Apollo 11 launchpad


I'm City A.M.'s award-winning technology editor, covering everything from happenings at Apple and Google to the latest London startup. In particular fintech, blockchain, artifical intelligence, driverless cars, virtual reality and the sharing economy get me out of bed in the morning. I'm always trying to illustrate stories with pictures of dogs. Sometimes with some success. I was named technology journalist of the year at the UK Tech Awards.

I'm City A.M.'s award-winning technology editor, covering everything from happenings at Apple and Google to the latest London startup. In particular fintech, blockchain, artifical intelligence, driverless cars, virtual reality and the sharing economy get me out of bed in the morning. I'm always trying to illustrate stories with pictures of dogs. Sometimes with some success. I was named technology journalist of the year at the UK Tech Awards.

Elon Musk's SpaceX has successfully launched a Falcon 9 rocket into space from the location where the Apollo 11 mission blasted off taking man to the moon for the first time.

The take-off from Launch Complex 39A at Kennedy Space Centre in Florida followed an aborted attempt on Saturday due to technical reasons.

‚ÄčThe Falcon 9 rocket blasted a Dragon cargo capsule into orbit, carrying supplies to the International Space Station (ISS), including science and research equipment. The reusable rocket then successfully landed back on earth, its first in the daytime and eighth successful landing overall.

Watch: SpaceX's Falcon 9 rocket landing back on earth


The Dragon capsule will make its way to the ISS over the next two days.

‚ÄčThe launch is the first from the Launch Complex 39A since 2011 signalling the historic location's switch to a commercial spaceport.

And for SpaceX it's the second successful launch under its belt since an explosion last year destroyed a rocket in pre-launch testing, including a payload which included Facebook's first ever satellite.

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