Thursday 19 January 2017 3:00 am

This is the most popular brand in the UK (and it’s not even from here)


I report on retail and property for City A.M. I have covered the investigation into BHS and London's housing crisis. You can email me on helen.cahill@cityam.com with tips or commentary.

I report on retail and property for City A.M. I have covered the investigation into BHS and London's housing crisis. You can email me on helen.cahill@cityam.com with tips or commentary.

Follow Helen Cahill

Aldi and Lidl have topped YouGov's ranking for the most popular British brands, beating well-heeled rivals John Lewis and Marks & Spencer.

Every week last year YouGov asked a group of consumers whether they had heard good or bad news about the biggest brands in Britain – and the German immigrants came out on top.

Read more: Aldi bags record Christmas sales after a year of store openings

American TV streaming website Netflix also did well, entering the top 10 for the first time at sixth place.

 

Both Aldi and Lidl have been trying to change their image this year with marketing campaigns designed to show the quality of their products. Over Christmas Aldi boasted that it was working with the same supplier as Waitrose. In a current TV advert, Lidl tells the story of a British kale farmer who aims to get his product from field to supermarket shelf in 48 hours.

Read more: A Merry Lidl Christmas: Lidl doubled its Prosecco sales this Christmas

The German discounters have also been seeking good headlines over staff pay.

In November last year, Lidl became the first supermarket to commit to the living wage rate of pay (which is higher than the national living wage). Not to be outdone but its competitor, Aldi then announced that it would go one step further to offer its workers the highest hourly pay of any supermarket.


Well-loved department store John Lewis came fourth in YouGov's brand index, behind BBC iPlayer.

Michael Stacey of YouGov said: "It no longer seems valid to label Aldi and Lidl as 'budget supermarkets'. With so many of their competitors following their lead in various ways, and they themselves pushing higher-end goods, both are now firmly part of the mainstream."

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