The most irritating office jargon of 2018, ranked by UK workers

 
Rebecca Smith
"Pick it up and run with it because we're on a journey" (Source: Getty)

We've all got our pet hates in the workplace, but few things can cause gritted teeth as quickly as some choice office jargon.

So, it is a no-brainer that today Glassdoor has today revealed the UK's most annoying work buzzwords of 2018, so we can all touch base on what have been the game-changing phrases of the year.

For the second year on the trot, "touch base" was in fact the most infuriating phrase for employees, with nearly a quarter citing it as the worst jargon.

Read more: The 10 things UK workers find most irritating about their colleagues

That was followed by no-brainer, punch a puppy, game changer, and pick it up and run with it.

New phrases that made the cut this year included "lipstick on a pig", and the bizarre "I want to leverage your synergies".

Most annoying office jargon of 2018

1. Touch base - to meet or talk about a specific issue

2. No-brainer - a decision is very easy or obvious

3. Punch a puppy - to do something horrible or for the greater good

4. Game changer - a unique or disruptive product or idea

5. Pick it up and run with it - to continue a process that someone else has started

6. Mission statement - a guiding objective or principle for a business

7. We're on a journey - bringing a team together to achieve a unified goal

8. If you don't like it get off the bus - implying that a colleague should leave if they are unhappy

9. Run this up the flagpole - gauging the popularity of a new idea

10. Lipstick on a pig - trying to improve a bad idea with superficial changes

“Although it’s hard to avoid saying all of these phrases, employees should be aware of overusing jargon which can often be confusing and undermine your credibility,” said John Lamphiere, Glassdoor’s managing director, EMEA.

Every company and team will have its own culture, and although terms such as ‘low hanging fruit’ and ‘no-brainer’ may seem pretty commonplace, they should be used sparingly to avoid putting off your colleagues.

Keeping your language clear and specific will result in you and your teammates consistently delivering the very best work possible.

Instead of falling back on the old office jargon, Glassdoor has recommended being authentic in the workplace, and working across teams when you get the chance to meet more people and help build better relationships.

Read more: These are the most bizarre rules Londoners have been made to follow at work

Related articles