Chris Tremlett: Whitewash Australia and England will feel they have long-term psychological edge over their rivals

 
Chris Tremlett
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Jos Buttler hit a century during the series-clinching third ODI against Australia (Source: Getty)

If England can win the two remaining one-dayers and whitewash Australia in their own backyard then they will believe they have the psychological edge over their rivals.

Never before have Australia suffered a 5-0 defeat in a bilateral one-day series on home soil and it would be deeply embarrassing for them, but the message it would send out from an English perspective would be huge.

When a team dominates a series like England are doing, batsmen and bowlers start winning individual battles and those players begin to feel that they have mastered opponents.

I didn’t play enough international one-day cricket to feel that any opposing player was my scalp, but in Test cricket current Australia skipper Steve Smith was my bunny. Likewise, the batsmen and bowlers in the side now will know which members of the opposing line-up they like to attack.

Things like that add up over the years and the momentum, whether from the side winning consistently or individuals feeling they have the measure of a rival, is vital to take into future series or a World Cup.

We’re used to England being good in their own conditions but this one-day side is starting to perform all around the world, with Australia one of the hardest places to play 50-over cricket.

Even if the whitewash does not materialise, it is England’s first ever bilateral series win in Australia. That is no mean feat in itself and it is something the players should be very proud of.

I recall the one-day matches after our Test series victory in Australia during 2010/11 and we lost 6-1; it goes to show how much this country has improved in the game’s shorter formats.

It also reinforces how talented a squad it is and I’m sure some will be going for big fees during this weekend’s Indian Premier League auction. Not so long ago English players weren’t being picked up at all, now their talent is being recognised and they are reaping the rewards from that. The future of England’s white-ball cricket looks promising.

In other news this week, my former Surrey team-mate Sam Curran was added to England's T20 squad for the tri-series with Australia and New Zealand.

The 19-year-old is a really exciting player to have around, nothing fazes him and like his brother, Tom, he has a really bright future. He might be better known for his bowling at present but his batting is really underrated.

I believe in the years to come he will be more of a batting all-rounder for England, the type of player to come in at No6 or No7 and really take the game away from the opposition.

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