The Old War Office in London, Winston Churchill's former HQ, is set to be converted into a luxury hotel

 
Shruti Tripathi Chopra
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The Grade II listed Old War Office has 1,100 rooms across seven floors

Former British Prime Minister Winston Churchill's old office is set to be converted into a luxury hotel and new residences.

Raffles Hotels & Resorts, the luxury brand of AccorHotels Group, Indian conglomerate Hinduja Group and Spanish construction company Obrascon Huarte Lain Desarrollos (OHLD) are working together to renovate the iconic Old War Office building in Whitehall.

The Grade II listed Old War Office, which has 1,100 rooms across seven floors and two miles of corridors, was snapped up by the Hinduja Group and OHLD for £350m in 2014.

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The site has been granted planning permission for a multi-purpose development including 125 rooms, 88 private residences, restaurants and other amenities. Completion is expected in just over three years.

The building – close to 10 Downing Street, the Houses of Parliament and Westminster Abbey – has also served as an office to former chancellor David Lloyd George and senior British Army officer Lord Kitchener.

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Sebastien Bazin, chairman and CEO of AccorHotels said: “This is the start of an important partnership for Raffles Hotels & Resorts and will create a new and vibrant landmark for London. This is a significant step for Raffles and a strategic addition to the Group’s Luxury portfolio. We remain committed to providing guests with unparalleled service and experience.”

Gopichand Hinduja, the Hinduja Group’s co-chairman said: “Our new partnership with Raffles Hotels and Resorts is a significant milestone in our vision to transform the Old War Office into London’s finest luxury destination. Raffles brings a unique understanding of British heritage and tradition that will help revive this great British landmark.”

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