World's richest football clubs 2016 revealed: Manchester United, Manchester City, Arsenal and Chelsea lead way as Premier League tightens its stranglehold on Deloitte's Football Money League

Arsenal v Burnley - Premier League
Arsenal are among 17 English teams in Deloitte's Football Money League top 30 (Source: Getty)

1. Real Madrid
Spain
Real retained top spot in the Football Money League for the 11th year in succession having increased revenue once again in 2014-15, despite losing their Champions League and Copa del Rey titles to arch-rivals Barcelona, who also pipped them to La Liga.
  • Matchday Revenue: €129.8m (£98.8m)
  • Broadcasting Revenue: €199.9m (£152.1m)
  • Commercial Revenue: €247.3m (£188.1m)
Total Revenue: €577m (£439m)
2. FC Barcelona
Spain
Barca enjoyed a 16 per cent increase in revenue in 2014-15, lifting them above Manchester United and back into second place in the Football Money League, following a season in which they swept to a Champions League, La Liga and Copa del Rey treble.
  • Matchday Revenue: €116.9m (£88.9m)
  • Broadcasting Revenue: €199.8m (£152m)
  • Commercial Revenue: €244.1m (£185.7m)
Total Revenue: €560.8m (£426.6m)
3. Manchester United
England
United may be set to reclaim top spot in the 2017 Football Money League, but they fell to third in this year’s list as the absence of Champions League action in 2014-15 inflicted double-digit decreases on both match-day and broadcast revenue.
  • Matchday Revenue: €114m (£86.7m)
  • Broadcasting Revenue: €141.6m (£107.7m)
  • Commercial Revenue: €263.9m (£200.8m)
Total Revenue: €519.5m (£395.2m)
4. Paris Saint-Germain
France
PSG grew revenue slightly in a landmark 2014-15 season that saw them win a domestic treble and reach the last eight of the Champions League. Those earnings, swelled by world-leading commercial income of €297m, lifted the Qatar-backed team to fourth in the Football Money League.
  • Matchday Revenue: €78m (£59.3m)
  • Broadcasting Revenue: €105.8m (£80.5m)
  • Commercial Revenue: €297m (£226m)
Total Revenue: €480.8m (£365.8m)
5. Bayern Munich
Germany
Bayern won the Bundesliga at a canter again in 2014-15 yet slipped to their lowest position in the Football Money League since 2007. Revenues dipped slightly, notably from commercial streams, where other European giants made ground on the Germans.
  • Matchday Revenue: €89.8m (£68.3m)
  • Broadcasting Revenue: €106.1m (£80.7m)
  • Commercial Revenue: €278.1m (£211.6m)
Total Revenue: 474m (£360.6m)
6. Manchester City
England
An unremarkable season on the pitch in which they failed to defend Premier League and League Cup titles only slightly slowed City’s rapid revenue growth in 2014-15. Their €463.5m (£352.6m) was still a club record and kept them sixth in the Football Money League.
  • Matchday Revenue: €57m (£43.4m)
  • Broadcasting Revenue: €178m (£135.4m)
  • Commercial Revenue: €228.5m (£173.8m)
Total Revenue: €463.5m (£352.6m)
7. Arsenal
England
The Gunners defended the FA Cup in 2014-15 and that success was mirrored by revenue gains which lifted them one place in the Football Money League. Some 85 per cent of their increased income came from commercial streams, notably a new kit deal with Puma.
  • Matchday Revenue: €132m (£100.4m)
  • Broadcasting Revenue: €167.7m (£127.6m)
  • Commercial Revenue: €135.8m (£103.3m)
Total Revenue: €435.5m (£331.3m)
8. Chelsea
England
They might have reclaimed the Premier League and won the League Cup but Chelsea’s 2014-15 revenues were hit by a last-16 Champions League exit – they reached the semis the previous season – and slipped behind rivals Arsenal in the Football Money League.
  • Matchday Revenue: €93.1m (£70.8m)
  • Broadcasting Revenue: €178.2m (£135.6m)
  • Commercial Revenue: €148.7m (£113.1m)
Total Revenue: €420m (£319.5m)
9. Liverpool
England
The almost-Premier League winning exploits of the previous campaign paid dividends in 2014-15, as Liverpool saw revenue increase by 17 per cent thanks to improved match-day and broadcast earnings related to their return to the Champions League.
  • Matchday Revenue: €75m (£57.1m)
  • Broadcasting Revenue: €163.8m (£124.6m)
  • Commercial Revenue: €153m (£116.4m)
Total Revenue: €391.8m (£298.1m)
10. Juventus
Italy
Juve won Serie A for a fourth consecutive season, added a record 10th Coppa Italia title and reached the Champions League final in 2014-15, helping boost revenue by 16 per cent and cementing their place in the Football Money League top 10.
  • Matchday Revenue: €51.4m (£39.1m)
  • Broadcasting Revenue: €199m (£151.4m)
  • Commercial Revenue: €73.5m (£55.9m)
Total Revenue: €323.9m (£246.4m)
11. Borussia Dortmund
Germany
Despite a turbulent 2014-15 season in which they started disastrously before salvaging seventh place in the Bundesliga and bade farewell to coach Jurgen Klopp, Dortmund posted record revenues, yet the gap between them and the Football Money League top 10 widened.
  • Matchday Revenue: €54.2m (£41.2m)
  • Broadcasting Revenue: €82.1m (£62.5m)
  • Commercial Revenue: €144.3m (£109.8m)
Total Revenue: €280.6m (£213.5m)
12. Tottenham Hotspur
England
Spurs recorded a nine per cent increase in revenue in 2014-15, thanks largely to a new five-year shirt sponsorship deal with insurers AIA, to climb one place in the Football Money League. On-field they finished fifth domestically and reached the League Cup final.
  • Matchday Revenue: €54.2m (£41.2m)
  • Broadcasting Revenue: €125.2m (£95.3m)
  • Commercial Revenue: €78.1m (£59.4m)
Total Revenue: €257.5m (£195.9m)
13. Schalke 04
Germany
The Gelsenkirchen outfit grew revenue marginally and climbed one place in the Football Money League despite a lukewarm 2014-15 season in which Schalke finished outside out of the Bundesliga’s top four for the first time in five years.
  • Matchday Revenue: €39.2m (£29.8m)
  • Broadcasting Revenue: €72.6m (£55.2m)
  • Commercial Revenue: €107.9m (£82.1m)
Total Revenue: €219.7m (£167.1m)
14. AC Milan
Italy
AC Milan suffered the largest fall in revenue of any leading club – 20 per cent – as the Rossoneri felt the pinch from a lack of European competition. Having dropped out of the Football Money League top 10 for the first time last year they slipped another two places.
  • Matchday Revenue: €22.3m (£17m)
  • Broadcasting Revenue: €79.7m (£60.6m)
  • Commercial Revenue: €97.1m (£73.9m)
Total Revenue: €199.1m (£151.5m)
15. Atlético de Madrid
Spain
The Spanish capital’s second team grew income by 10 per cent in 2014-15 despite failing to match the previous season’s landmark La Liga triumph, yet their total revenue is merely a third of their two biggest rivals, Football Money League top two Real Madrid and Barcelona.
  • Matchday Revenue: €37.2m (£28.3m)
  • Broadcasting Revenue: €86.6m (£65.9m)
  • Commercial Revenue: €63.3m (£48.1m)
Total Revenue: €187.1m (£142.3m)
16. AS Roma
Italy
The financial significance of qualifying for the Champions League was underlined by Roma’s 42 per cent revenue growth, which was driven by their return to the competition in 2014-15 and lifted them back into the Football Money League top 20.
  • Matchday Revenue: €30.4m (£23.1m)
  • Broadcasting Revenue: €114m (£86.7m)
  • Commercial Revenue: €36m (£27.4m)
Total Revenue: €180.4m (£137.2m)
17. Newcastle United
England
The Magpies climbed two places in the Football Money League despite recording a drop in revenue (in sterling) in 2014-15, as they endured a difficult campaign that saw them only avoid relegation to the second tier on the last day of the season.
  • Matchday Revenue: €35.2m (£26.8m)
  • Broadcasting Revenue: €101.4m (£77.1m)
  • Commercial Revenue: €32.7m (£24.9m)
Total Revenue: €169.3m (£128.8m)
18. Everton
England
A slight increase in revenue, following a run to the last 16 of the Europa League and despite a mid-table finish in the 2014-15 Premier League as well as early cup exits, lifted the Toffees two places in the Football Money League.
  • Matchday Revenue: €24.6m (£18.7m)
  • Broadcasting Revenue: €114.1m (£86.8m)
  • Commercial Revenue: €26.4m (£20.1m)
Total Revenue: €165.1m (£125.6m)
19. Internazionale
Italy
Flat revenues for 2014-15 dragged Inter, who were in the Football Money League top 10 just four years ago, further down the pecking order. A failure to qualify for this season’s European competition will dent their chances of improving in the 2017 list.
  • Matchday Revenue: €22.2m (£16.9m)
  • Broadcasting Revenue: €97.2m (£74m)
  • Commercial Revenue: €45.4m (£34.5m)
Total Revenue: €164.8m (£125.4m)
20. West Ham United
England
The Hammers are back in the Football Money League top 20 after a nine-year absence following a five per cent growth in revenue during 2014-15. That was driven by increased broadcast income but also helped by a club-record commercial deal with Betway.
  • Matchday Revenue: €26.2m (£19.9m)
  • Broadcasting Revenue: €103.8m (£79m)
  • Commercial Revenue: €30.9m (£23.5m)
Total Revenue: €160.9m (£122.4m)

All 20 English Premier League clubs could feature among the world’s 30 richest football teams once bumper new television contracts worth £8bn kick in next season.

Read more: Man Utd poised to replace Real Madrid at top of rich list

That forecast, which underlines the financial superiority enjoyed by even modest English sides over all but the very biggest European outfits, is contained in Deloitte’s Football Money League 2016.

The annual ranking of clubs by revenue contains a record nine Premier League clubs in its top 20 and 17 in the top 30 – also an all-time high figure.

World's 20 richest clubs by revenue stream (€)

Real Madrid, who earned €577m (£439m) in 2014-15, top the list for an 11th year in a row, with Manchester United third and Manchester City, Arsenal, Chelsea and Liverpool occupying positions six to nine.

Tottenham are 12th, Newcastle and Everton 17th and 18th respectively, and West Ham 20th. Southampton, Aston Villa, Leicester, Sunderland, Swansea, Stoke, Crystal Palace and West Brom are all in the top 30.

Read more: Arsenal overtake Chelsea to become London's richest

“With over half of the top 30 already made up of Premier League clubs, and the staggering new Premier League domestic broadcast deal coming into effect in 2016-17, there is an outside chance that the Money League top 30 will feature all 20 Premier League clubs in two years’ time,” the report says.

England’s top-flight teams currently benefit from three-year TV contracts worth around £5.2bn, but a new cycle of deals estimated to be worth £8bn will boost their advantage further still.

Deloitte expects United’s new £75m-a-year Adidas kit deal to see them overtake Real and second-placed Barcelona in the 2017 list and become the world’s richest for the first time since 2005.

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