Fine wine investment has leaped since Brexit: These vintages will give you the biggest return on investment

 
Courtney Goldsmith
Follow Courtney
Wine from Corsica is being served during
Wine investment has risen by 20 per cent in the year to date. (Source: Getty)

The market for wine investment has risen 20 per cent in the year to date, boosted by the Brexit vote, a new report has suggested.

With uncertainties in traditional markets caused by the vote to leave the European Union, investors wanting to capitalise on weak sterling are looking for alternatives.

Read more: It's happening: Majestic Wine is now offering next-day delivery

Compared to other "treasure" assets like art or classic cars, fine wine nearly always performed at the top of the measurements of the study by Vin-X, a wine investment company (funnily enough).

In the report, Vin-X analysed 25 Bordeaux wines since 2008 and concluded investors should mix prime mid and off vintages to drive growth and minimise risks.

Peter Shakeshaft, founder and chief executive of Vin-X, said: “Including fine wine in your portfolio could be an important addition providing stability and growth over the years ahead – particularly at a time of historically low interest rates.

“Despite the fact that fine wine is a very stable asset – not as volatile as equities and not directly correlated to the performance of the financial markets – to get the most out of your investment you still need to monitor performance.”

Read more: Where is the most affordable place to buy wine? Not the UK...

The wines selected for analysis included Bordeaux First Growths and their Second Wines, Super Seconds and Right Bank wines.

The best performers, according to the analysis, were:

  • 2008 – 2011: Off vintage First Growths and their Second Wines

  • 2011 – 2014: Off vintage Super Seconds and Right Bank wine, particularly Angelus and Pavie

  • 2014 – 2016: Mid vintage First Growths and their Second Wines

  • 2016: Mid vintage First Growths and their Second Wines

Vin-X predicted an increasing move toward prime vintages as the new market in China becomes more "normalised and quality sensitive".

Related articles