Opinion

COMMENT

WHEN historians come to write the history of Swiss banking in the 21st century, the mid-2010s are likely to be some of the better thumbed chapters.

Congenital insensitivity to pain is a rare and dangerous disorder that causes those afflicted by it to, quite literally, feel no pain. This happens because of a genetic malfunction that prevents “pain signals” from being transmitted to the brain.

It's enough to make an accountant develop a nervous one. This week Amazon snapped up Twitch, a video platform and community for computer gamers, paying the princely sum of $970m (£585m) in cash.

Back to school. Three little words that excite all squabble-weary parents at this time of year. For me, the relief is accompanied by a kind of dread at the thought of re-entering the world of timetables, permission slips and after-school clubs.

Mike Smithson, editor of PoliticalBetting.com, says Yes.

It is surprisingly easy to find bankers with positive things to say about Andrew Bailey, their chief regulator.

Fresh data, but no fresh hope for the mid-market grocers. Tesco dropped its market share to 28.8 per cent in the 12 weeks to 17 August, down from 30.2 per cent last year. Sainsbury’s also edged down.

SWEDEN continues to be one of the countries others look to for an answer to this fundamental question of our times: how can a country successfully combine increasing prosperity with a relatively egalitarian distribution?

FROM allegedly failing to execute trades at the best price, to clients being misled about the type of trade being executed, trading in dark pools has taken its fair share of criticism recently.

THE INTRODUCTION of paper money revolutionised the way we exchanged goods and services. Now, the booming UK financial technology (fintech) sector is fast changing the way we bank, invest and raise money.

Ian Angus Mackenzie, chief executive of Harris Tweed Hebrides, says Yes - the business case for Scottish independence has not been made.

You may be coolly and calmly considering a job offer - or choosing objectively between several, if you’re lucky.

The sun, I hope, has finally made an appearance this morning, to remind us that – despite this week’s cold and wind and rain – we are still, technically, in summertime.

Are we witnessing a comeback from traditional high street retailer HMV? Recent figures suggest so, with announce­ments highlighting stronger sales and consumer perception.

PRIOR to the financial crisis, life was relatively straightforward for central bankers. They favoured opacity over their future actions, using the theoretical argument that transparency was a threat to credibility.

SIR JAMES Mirrlees is one of the mere handful of British recipients of the Nobel Prize in economics. And as his fine old Scottish surname might suggest, he has been active in the debate on independence.

IN A typically verbose article for the Daily Telegraph, the mayor of London Boris Johnson has warned of the “tide of terror” that will “eventually lap at our front door” if something isn’t done to curb the advance of the Islamic State (IS) in the

Yannick Naud, portfolio manager at Sturgeon Capital, says Yes.

While eSports may look and sound like child’s play, it is in fact big business.

Once again in Iraq – like some diabolical version of Bill Murray’s predicament in the peerless Groundhog Day – Western countries are arming the locals, with the US launching air strikes to stabilise a situation unhinged at least in part by our own

Two things tend to happen without fail at this time of year: the holiday season draws to a close – and young people everywhere receive their much anticipated exam results.

It seems a common refrain that modern life is busier and more hectic than ever – and this can feel especially true on the first day back at work after a Bank Holiday.

After Australia passed a first-of-its-kind law in 2012 mandating that all cigarettes be sold in plain brown packaging free of branding, UK health secretary Jeremy Hunt vowed to keep a close eye on the Australian law’s progress before introducing s

The Institute of Economic Affairs (IEA) recently released a monograph by Roger Koppl about the Great Recession (and the theory of recessions and recoveries more generally).  Titled

Want to annoy your boss? Why wouldn’t you?

Lots of reasons were bandied about yesterday as to why, despite an overwhelmingly positive set of results, Quindell’s shares were still hurting.

COMPANIES claim all the time that “people are our greatest asset”, and that they invest in their employees. However, this may simply be marketing spin – instead, the firm’s true objective is to maximise profit.

Look who’s back. Tomorrow night Peter Capaldi, formerly swear-master Malcolm Tucker from The Thick of It, takes his place at the Tardis console.

WHETHER you have a son or daughter who has been nervously awaiting their exam results or you’re a high-tech manufacturer hoping to add to your pool of skilled technicians, we all want young people to get the chance to fulfil their potential – not

Jennifer McKeown, senior European economist at Capital Economics, says Yes.

Pope Francis visited Seoul, South Korea last Saturday, where he urged wealthy nations to “hear the cry of the poor” and resist the “allure of materialism.” The condemnation of capitalism and inequality has been a common theme for Francis since his

ANTHONY Gutman, the Goldman Sachs banker, is something of a high-flyer. Having worked on several of the biggest deals of 2014, his summer job has been to advise Balfour Beatty over the proposed merger with Carillion.

When Scottish voters go to the polls in their independence referendum next month, they may ultimately make their decision on the basis of a single question: if we voted Yes, what currency would we use?

THE ANGRY reaction to this week’s announcement of inflation-beating fare rises shows just how little the current train franchise system has succeeded in winning the hearts and minds of travellers.

THE appalling decapitation of American journalist James Foley, apparently by a British member of the Islamic State (IS), is a shocking development in an already tragic conflict.

Sam Alderson, an economist at the Centre for Economic and Business Research, says Yes.

Are you bored at work? Passed over for that promotion? Find yourself procrastinating or spending time surfing the net to make up office face time? Feel like you’re not getting anywhere? Then you may be suffering from stalled career syndrome.

Plans for a leaner, meaner and more profitable mining giant drew little love from investors yesterday. It was easy to see why – but that doesn’t mean the prospects for a slimmed-down BHP Billiton aren’t shiny.

Following on from my column last week covering the home broad­band market, I analyse another area in which BT has expanded in to – live broadcasts of Premier League matches.