WHAT THE TWO SIDES SAY

Sky

“Ofcom’s analysis is deficient. The deal will have minimal impact on consumers and would not enhance News Corporation's ability to influence the news”

News Corp alleges that Ofcom did not have an open mind when considering the issue of plurality. This allegation is without foundation.”

TIME LINE | TWISTS AND TURNS OF THE BID

June 2010: News Corp bids for the 61 per cent of Sky it doesn’t already own. News Corp shares jump four per cent despite the £7bn offer. The bid is swiftly rejected by the Sky board who say the firm is worth more.

July 2010: The two sides hold meetings to discuss the value of the firm. No further bid is made and the firms decide to put talks on ice until regulatory approval is given to a potential bid.

September 2010: Business secretary Vince Cable, who has jurisdiction over the bid, asks Ofcom to draft a report advising whether the Competition Commission should become involved.

October 2010: UK media companies including the Telegraph and the Mirror release a joint statement condemning the bid.

December 2010: Cable is caught in a sting by reporters, bragging about “going to war” with Rupert Murdoch.

January 2011: His replacement Jeremy Hunt delays final decision to give News Corp time to file evidence.