WHAT THE OTHER PAPERS SAY THIS MORNING

FINANCIAL TIMES

IRAN SETS STAGE FOR TENSE OPEC MEETING
Iran’s president, who has declared himself “acting” oil minister, might chair next month’s meeting of Opec, according to a senior aide, setting the stage for a highly politicised gathering of the cartel. Mahmoud Ahmadi-Nejad, who is locked in a power struggle with rivals in Iran’s conservative establishment, has put himself in temporary charge of the oil ministry at a time when Iran holds the rotating presidency of Opec.

LEVIN IN REAL HOPE OF FRESH GOLDMAN PROBE
Carl Levin, chairman of the Senate investigative subcommittee, said there was “real hope” law enforcement authorities would act on his panel’s report accusing Goldman Sachs of misleading investors and Congress. The Senate report criticised rating agencies, regulators and other banks. But Goldman has drawn particular focus. Eric Holder, attorney-general, said this month the justice department was looking at the report “that deals with Goldman”.

LAWRENCE MURDER SUSPECTS TO STAND TRIAL
Two men are to stand trial for the murder of Stephen Lawrence, the black teenager who was killed in an unprovoked attack 18 years ago. David Norris and Gary Dobson will stand trial at the Old Bailey later this year for the murder in Eltham, south-east London in 1993.

TORY MP BACKS TOTE OFFER FROM BROUGHTON
A prominent Tory MP and former adviser to the chancellor has weighed into the debate about who should buy the Tote, saying the bid from Sir Martin Broughton offered better prospects for the racing industry than a rival offer from Betfred.

THE TIMES

WANTED: NEW RECRUITS FOR AN AGEING NUCLEAR FAMILY
Almost a third of Britain’s nuclear inspectors are eligible to retire within three years, leaving a potential “knowledge gap” within the regulator. The Office for Nuclear Regulation has hired 93 new inspectors since 2008. But of the 217 inspectors, 30 per cent are over the age of 57, 11 per cent are over 60 and 70 could retire by 2015.

MAGNERS TRIO SET TO SHARE £27M WINDFALL
Three former Scottish & Newcastle executives parachuted in to rescue the maker of Magners Irish Cider stand to share more than £27m. The potential windfall for John Dunsmore, Stephen Glancey and Kenny Neison represents a rise in shares after a controversial regime of redundancies and disposals.

The Daily Telegraph

KAZAKHS THREATEN TO HALT BG GAS FIELD
Kazakhstan has threatened to freeze BG’s $23bn (£14.2bn) gas project unless the company backs down in a long-running dispute with the government. “Without reaching agreement, phase three of the project will not be set in motion. Full stop,” said Sauat Mynbayev, the Kazakh oil and gas minister. “If we fail to reach agreement, the project will be frozen.”

CREATIVE INDUSTRY WELCOMES HARGREAVES' FAIR USE REJECTION
A report which has called for changes to the UK’s intellectual property (IP) regime but rejects calls for a US style fair use regime has been welcomed by the creative industry. The review, led by Professor Ian Hargreaves of Cardiff University, made ten recommendations which it claimed would add £750m a year to the UK economy.

THE WALL STREET JOURNAL

EU ANTITRUST PROBE LOOKS AT ASIAN SHIPPING LINES
The European Commission is investigating several Asian shipping lines as part of its wider probe into anticompetition infringements in the sector, companies said yesterday. Hong Kong's Orient Overseas, Taiwan's Evergreen Marine and South Korea’s Hanjin Shipping all said that EU Commission officials had visited their respective offices in Europe.

HEAT TURNS UP ON GREIFELD
After failing in his fight for the New York Stock Exchange, Nasdaq OMX chief executive Robert Greifeld is feeling the heat over his deal-making skills. Some Nasdaq shareholders have complained the chief was too openly confident that US regulators would give a green light to combining the nation’s two largest stock exchanges.