PROOF THAT SEX SELLS AS RACY DOMAIN NAME BREAKS WORLD RECORD

 
Elizabeth Fournier
ACCORDING to the famous TV theme, “Dedication’s what you need; if you wanna be a record breaker”. And it looks like the sellers of the Sex.com domain name should be grateful to internet users everywhere for their dedication to illicit surfing – the £8.2m sale of the address last year means it has been officially recognised as the most expensive domain name in the world.

Online domain broker Sedo spent two years putting together the sale, with the lucrative hours spent “establishing the relationship, researching and finding the right buyer”.

Apparently that mystery buyer was the privately held Clover Holdings – a company that very little is known about beyond it being registered in the Caribbean island of Saint Vincent. Clover jumped in with the highest offer just a week before the domain was due to go to auction, denying all those budding internet porn barons the chance to snap it up.

Once the sale was complete the Guinness World Record officials were called in to verify its status – dragging them away from their day-to-day fare of measuring the world’s longest piece of nougat and counting members of the largest kazoo ensemble.

The news also comes as former home secretary Jacqui Smith hits a different kind of campaign trail, publicising her Radio 5 Live documentary on the UK’s porn industry.

In promo shots for the show Smith is photographed in a shiny trenchcoat outside one of

Soho’s less salubrious nightspots, turning her hand to a new career as a broadcaster on the back of her husband’s embarrassing viewing habits.

It seems like the old adage – sex sells – is still ringing true in two of the world’s oldest professions; business and politics.

HOLDING THE BABY
IT looks like childcare arrangements are really being stretched by the majority of London’s schools being on half-term this week.

Spotted in the City canteen, No. 1 Lombard Street, yesterday lunchtime: two men and a baby.

The diners, who tactfully positioned themselves near the restaurant’s entrance, were seen engaged in lively conversation as the child – who stayed in his buggy rather than taking a seat at the table – looked on, no doubt a captive audience to discussions of rights issues and the like.

A call to the restaurant confirmed that it has no set child policy in place, so while older kids hit the slopes with whichever parent has been lucky enough to book this popular week off, it looks like those still hard at work have found the perfect lunchtime creche.

It could be a while though before a dedicated kid’s menu appears, or high-chairs and crayons are handed out on arrival.

RUGBY FOR RIFLES
For those already dreading in advance the end of the Six Nations tournament next month, fear not.

Rugby fans still can get their fix and support a good cause at the same time on 2 April, as Orpington residents the Westcombe Park Colts take on local rivals the Bromley Borough BaaBaas in a charity match to raise money for both the Rifles Benevolent Trust’s Care for Casualties appeal, and the Royal British Legion’s poppy appeal.

Trading platform Savi Markets is sponsoring the match, which is being played in honour of local hero James Brown, who was killed in Afghanistan in 2009 at the age of 18.

Profits raised will also go towards installing a permanent brass tribute plaque at James’ old school, and at his local Royal British Legion club.

At just £3 entry and with Westcombe Park’s clubhouse open from 10.30am, even non-rugby fans are guaranteed a good time.