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CITY VIEWS: WHAT DOES THE T-MOBILE / ORANGE TIE-UP MEAN FOR COMPETITION IN THE MOBILE INDUSTRY?

<strong>OLIVER THOMAS </strong>INSURANCE RISK PARTNERS<br /><br />&ldquo;The merger doesn&rsquo;t really worry me. There are still a number of service providers, and they all need to work together, so it is not like we are going to see a monopoly as such, like we had with BT. If there was more consolidation and less choice, then yes, that would bother me.&rdquo;<br /><br /><strong>JUDITH ANDREWS </strong>KERRY LONDON<br /><br />&ldquo;I think that it could possibly affect choice and prices, but I am an O2 customer and have become an iPhone lover. It is all about the hardware for me, as long as O2 have exclusivity I will stay with them. If the new player were to win the iPhone contract, that would be a consideration.&rdquo;<br /><br /><strong>DINA RAJAONA </strong>KLEINWORT BENSON<br /><br />&ldquo;I am not sure that the merger deal will be good for competition. But following the crisis, there is be a smaller pie, so there will probably be fewer players. I would expect the regulators to be much more relaxed as well. This is just the beginning for mergers from across all industries.&rdquo;<br /><br /><strong>EDWARD STRICKLAND </strong> THOMAS LEGAL<br /><br />&ldquo;I am not concerned as a consumer. I think mobile companies try to charge whatever they can get away with, and it is up to the regulator to oversee the tariffs. I cannot imagine that, if companies had a smaller market share, they would be any more competitive than they are now.&rdquo;