What the other papers say this morning - 19 November 2013

FINANCIAL TIMES

Data reveals indebted generation
The earnings of recent English graduates have deteriorated so rapidly since the financial crisis that the latest class is earning 12 per cent less than their pre-crash counterparts at the same stage in their careers. They also owe about 60 per cent more in student debt. These are the young people to whom the country will turn over the next 20 years to fund the retirement of the baby boomer generation.

Rajan’s dramatic remaking of banks
India’s central bank governor, Raghuram Rajan, has promised to carry out a “dramatic remaking” of the country’s banking sector as he seeks to introduce a new era of competition in Asia’s third-largest economy.

Merkel: spy claims hit trade talks
German chancellor Angela Merkel yesterday warned that the NSA spying scandal was putting pressure on talks to forge an EU-US trade pact.

THE TIMES

Gunman sowing terror in Paris
A photographer at Liberation, the French daily, was fighting for his life yesterday after being shot by an armed man who burst into the newspaper’s office in Paris with shotgun. The incident comes three days after a gunman threatened staff at BFMTV, the French rolling news channel, before fleeing without firing a shot. All media outlets in Paris were immediately placed under police protection.

The Daily Telegraph

G4S up for Commonwealth contract
G4S, the security firm that admitted its failure to provide enough staff for the London Olympics was a “shambles”, is in line to win a stewarding contract for the Glasgow Commonwealth Games.

THE WALL STREET JOURNAL

Nicola Horlick asks savers for backing
Fund manager Nicola Horlick is seeking investment for a West London restaurant.

Time Warner in streaming deal
Time Warner Cable subscribers will soon be able to watch shows from the Discovery Channel or Animal Planet online, including on tablets or smartphones, thanks to a deal unveiled yesterday.

Chinese investors expect baby boom
Shares of baby-formula producers, piano makers and tutoring companies all jumped after the one-child limit was eased.