What the other papers say this morning - 29 October 2013

FINANCIAL TIMES

Swiss launch criminal probe into F1
Swiss prosecutors have begun a criminal investigation into the Formula One bribery scandal, potentially opening another front in the legal battles being fought by F1 chief executive Bernie Ecclestone. Prosecutors in Geneva will examine the circumstances of a $44m payment to German banker Gerhard Gribkowsky who worked on the motorsport’s sale to private equity group CVC in 2006.

EADS plans to cull jobs and cut costs
EADS is planning to cull jobs and slash costs as Europe’s biggest aerospace company restructures its defence business, which has been mired by Europe’s long-term decline in military spending.

Google accelerates Glass rollout
Google is starting to expand production of its experimental wearable technology, Glass, releasing tens of thousands more units in the coming months.

THE TIMES

Vicar’s son accused of hacking
A vicar’s son has been charged with stealing thousands of computer files from the US government in what experts believe is the most serious computer hacking case to date. Lauri Love, 28, from the Suffolk village of Stradishall, was accused yesterday of being part of an international group of computer hackers. It is alleged they stole “massive quantities” of secret information about the US government.

The Daily Telegraph

Supermarkets to save £1.3bn in rates
Bill Grimsey, the former boss of Iceland and Wickes, has claimed the government’s decision to postpone a revaluation of business rates will save Britain’s biggest supermarkets £1.3bn in tax.

Airbus: make economy seats wider
Airbus believes it has come up with a solution to sleepless long-haul flights in economy: widen the seats by just an inch.

THE WALL STREET JOURNAL

Boeing considers new plant
Boeing is evaluating whether to give its non-unionised South Carolina facility a bigger role in building the planned new version of its 777 long-range jet.

Web giants threaten end to cookies
Microsoft and Google have said they are developing systems to bypass the more than a thousand software companies that place cookies on websites.