Fawcett Society warns of slipping backwards on gender pay gap progress

 
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International Women's Day Marked With Rallies And Protests Across The Country
Today's the day women stop being paid - technically (Source: Getty)

Young women are facing an even bigger pay gap than their predecessors, a leading campaign group has warned.

Campaign groups are today marking "Equal Pay Day", which they say is the day women begin to work for free until the end of the year due to the pay gap between men and women.

The date has remained the same for the last three years, which the Fawcett Society says shows the lack of progress on tackling the gap, and that it will take another 100 years to gain equal pay at the current rate.

Sam Smethers, chief executive of the Fawcett Society, said: “At a time when we are breaking the taboo of talking about sexual harassment in the workplace we need to wake up to the fact that a culture which tolerates or even fosters sexual harassment isn’t going to pay women properly either, and we know that younger women are particularly likely to experience harassment.”

The group also said that although the gap is wider for women in their 50s, it is also growing among younger women, rising from 1.1 per cent in 2011 to 5.5 per cent this year.

The gap was also calculated to be highest in London, at 20.7 per cent.

It comes a day after a review into the numbers of women at the very top of business, which told FTSE 350 companies to boost its efforts to hire more women on boards.

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