Damian Green denies porn allegations after claims it was found on computer used in parliament

 
Lynsey Barber
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Theresa May's deputy is being investigated by the cabinet office over separate claims (Source: Getty)

Damian Green, the most senior minister in Theresa May's government, has denied claims that pornographic material was found on a computer he used in parliament.

"The story is completely untrue and comes from a tainted and untrustworthy source," he said in a statement.

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The material was allegedly found during an investigation by police into an unrelated matter around government leaks in 2008. The claims were made by an ex-police chief in a report published in the Sunday Times.

In the statement, Green said:

“I’ve been aware for some years that the discredited former assistant commissioner Bob Quick has tried to cause me political damage by leaking false information about the raid on my parliamentary office. No newspaper has printed this story due to the complete lack of any evidence.

"It is well known that Quick, who was forced to apologise for alleging that the Conservative party was trying to undermine him, harbours deep resentment about his press treatment during the time of my investigation. More importantly, the police have never suggested to me that improper material was found on my parliamentary computer, nor did I have a ‘private’ computer, as has been claimed.

"The allegations about the material and computer, now nine years old, are false, disreputable political smears from a discredited police officer acting in flagrant breach of his duty to keep the details of police investigations confidential, and amount to little more than an unscrupulous character assassination.”

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Green has also denied separate claims that he touched the knee of a female Tory activist and sent her suggestive text messages as untrue and "deeply hurtful". The cabinet office has launched an inquiry into the claims.

Revelations of sexual harassment in Westminster have led to several investigations into MPs behaviour by the government and political parties.

Defence secretary Michael Fallon resigned after saying his previous behaviour had "fallen short". Today, the political journalist Jane Merrick accused Fallon of lunging at her and trying to kiss her on the lips in 2003. She reported the incident to Number 10 before his resignation.

Meanwhile, lobby group the Confederation of British Industry (CBI) called on companies to stamp out harassment across business.

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“Sexual harassment in all forms is totally unacceptable in today’s Britain. The harm done to people’s lives, self-esteem and dignity is profound. We must work together to stamp it out," said director-general Carolyn Fairbairn.

“Westminster and Hollywood are currently in the spotlight, but there can be no doubt that it exists elsewhere, including in some businesses."

The group outlined three areas whre businesses need to take action: ensureing clear processes for reporting concerns over harrassement "in confidence and without fear"; reveiw or develop codes of conduct to ensure everyone understands it; and to continue increasing diversity efforts across the workforce, including at a senior level.

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