Wizz Air and Ryanair reporting soaring traffic for September despite Irish carrier's mass cancellation woes

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Ryanair said load factor also climbed (Source: Getty)

Wizz Air and Ryanair announced growing traffic for September this morning, despite the Irish carrier suffering from the fallout from mass flight cancellations.

Hungarian carrier Wizz Air reported a 26 per cent rise in passenger numbers, with load factor, gauging how efficient an airline is at filling its seats, edging up to 92.9 per cent. 

The Irish airline meanwhile, reported a 10 per cent rise in traffic to 11.8m customers, with load factor up two percentage points to 97 per cent.

Read more: Monarch dethroned: Rival budget airlines’ shares take off as firm collapses

Ryanair chief marketing officer Kenny Jacobs said the figures included the 2,100 flight cancellations announced for September and October, as the airline admitted it had mismanaged pilot holiday.

"We have now refunded/re-accommodated 98 per cent of customers who were impacted in September and October," Jacobs added. "The remaining two per cent of affected customers have yet to contact us."

The good news for the airlines comes after the news that Luton-based Monarch collapsed into administration yesterday.

Shares in some of Monarch's rivals rose on the news that Britain's fifth biggest carrier had stopped trading. EasyJet, Ryanair, Flybe and Wizz Air shares all took off yesterday.

Monarch's chief executive Andrew Swaffield said on BBC Radio 4's Today programme that his airline was on track to lose around £100m next year and had "tried everything" but couldn't turn around its prospects.

The airline's collapse will lead to nearly 1,900 job losses, and will cost around £60m according to airline regulator the Civil Aviation Authority.

However, rival airlines may swoop for Monarch employees, with EasyJet on the lookout. Wizz Air meanwhile, announced its biggest recruitment programme to date last month.

It wants 1,300 new cabin crew and pilots ahead of the arrival of 21 new Airbus A320 and A321 aircraft.

Read more: Monarch proves it’s time airlines did some blue sky thinking