Former Yorkshire and England batsman Geoffrey Boycott apologises unreservedly for alleged racist comment about West Indian cricketers

 
Ross McLean
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Pakistan v England - 3rd Test: Day Three
Geoffrey Boycott played 108 Tests for England (Source: Getty)

Former Yorkshire and England batsman Geoffrey Boycott has offered an unreserved apology for an alleged racist comment about West Indian cricketers and the receipt of honours.

Boycott, who is set to keep his job as a BBC Test Match Special pundit, is said to have claimed that he would have more chance of being knighted if he was to “black his face”.

It is also believed that the 76-year-old said that knighthoods were handed out like “confetti” to West Indies greats such as Sir Viv Richards, Sir Garfield Sobers and Sir Curtly Ambrose.

“Speaking at an informal gathering I was asked a question and I realise my answer was unacceptable,” said Boycott, who played 108 Test for England during an international career spanning 18 years.

“I meant no offence but what I said was clearly wrong and I apologise unreservedly. I have loved West Indian cricket my whole life and have the utmost respect for its players.”

Boycott’s comments occurred while he was speaking at a question-and-answer session during a break in play at England’s day-night Test against West Indies at Edgbaston last week.

A BBC spokesperson said: “He has rightly apologised unreservedly for these clearly unacceptable comments. He will be part of the team for the West Indies Tests.”

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