Roger Federer leads oldest set of Wimbledon men's semi-finalists since 1970

 
Joe Hall
Follow Joe
Day Seven: The Championships - Wimbledon 2017
Federer is the joint most successful man in Wimbledon history (Source: Getty)

At 35 years old, Roger Federer leads the oldest set of men’s singles semi-finalists Wimbledon has seen in the open era.

The seemingly evergreen Swiss takes on 31-year-old Tomas Berdych on Centre Court tomorrow, after 29-year-old Sam Querrey has done battle with 28-year-old Marin Cilic in the first semi-final of the day.

Together, the four semi-finalists have an average age of 31 — the first time the final four in the men’s competition has exceeded 30 this century and the oldest set of semi-finalists since 1970.

World No5 Federer, the highest-ranked player left in the tournament, cemented his place in SW19 history long ago as a seven-time champion.

Read more: Konta misses out on biggest payday of career after semi-final loss

Yet winning this year’s tournament — his first Wimbledon title in five years — would arguably be Federer’s greatest achievement at the All England Club to date.

Victory would not only see the former world No1 surpass Peter Sampras to become the outright most successful men’s player in the tournament’s history, but would make Federer the oldest male champion of the modern era.

That record currently belongs to American Arthur Ashe who won as a 31-year-old in 1975.

The same record in the women’s singles competition could also be broken by 37-year-old Venus Williams, who defeated Britain’s Johanna Konta in straight sets in her semi-final.

Victory over Garbine Muguruza in Saturday’s final would see Williams take the record that currently belongs to her sister Serena, who won as a 34-year-old last year.

When Federer first tasted triumph on Centre Court in 2003, the average age of the four semi-finalists was just 23.

The average has increased steadily in the years since as Federer and the rest of the current top five — Novak Djokovic, Rafael Nadal, Andy Murray and Stan Wawrinka — have continued their dominance well into their 30s, sharing 47 of the 49 grand slam titles in the last 12 years.

Related articles