Volvo and Autoliv announce tie-up with artificial intelligence firm Nvidia in race to get driverless cars on sale by 2021

 
Rebecca Smith
One of Volvo Cars' XC90 Drive Me research cars on the autonomous drive route in Gothenburg, Sweden
One of Volvo Cars' XC90 Drive Me research cars on the autonomous drive route in Gothenburg, Sweden (Source: Volvo)

Volvo and Swedish car safety supplier Autoliv have teamed up with artificial intelligence firm Nvidia in their latest move in the driverless car race.

Swedish car giant Volvo wants to get driverless cars on sale by 2021.

The three firms are working together to develop advanced systems and software for driverless cars. Nvidia, which creates computer graphics, will install its Drive PX supercomputer system in Volvo cars by 2021.

Read more: Not a load of garbage: Volvo's testing driverless rubbish trucks

The new tie-up will involve the companies working together with Volvo and Autoliv’s newly formed joint venture Zenuity, to develop the tech for self-driving cars.

Jensen Huang, chief executive of Nvidia, said:

Artificial intelligence is the essential tool for solving the incredibly demanding challenge of autonomous driving.

We are building on our earlier collaboration with Volvo Cars to create production-ready vehicles that will make driving safer, lead to greener cities and reduce congestion on our roads.

“This cooperation with Nvidia places Volvo Cars, Autoliv and Zenuity at the forefront of the fast-moving market to develop next-generation autonomous driving capabilities and will speed up the development of Volvo’s own commercially available autonomous drive cars,” said Hakan Samuelsson, president and chief executive of Volvo Cars.

Nvidia also has partnerships with the likes of Toyota, Audi and Mercedes, while BMW has teamed up with US chipmaker Intel and Mobileye to develop a driverless platform.

Last month, Volvo unveiled its trials with an autonomous rubbish truck, designed for use in cities. It has partnered with local waste management specialist Renova in a project to explore how automation "can contribute to enhanced traffic safety, improved working conditions, and lower environmental impact".

The truck it has been working on has automatic control of steering, gear changing and speed.

Read more: Volvo eyes electric future as it puts the brakes on diesel engines

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