Summer heatwaves could cost Britons £214 in additional electricity bills

 
Oliver Gill
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Temperatures Soar As UK Heatwave Returns
Air conditioning units are not the only way of cooling down when the weather is hot (Source: Getty)

Whopping energy bills are set to no long be the preserve of winter months, it has been warned.

The UK's recent heatwave could cost the average British household an additional £214 this summer alone, as Brits plug in air conditioning units to stave off blistering temperatures.

Britons have been urged to consider whether they really need to leave on their watt-guzzling air conditioning units. The average device uses 16,200 watts over an 18-hour period. And according to comparethemarket.com, the cost of leaving it on for June, July and August will rack up £214 in additional costs.

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Even if units are left on for eight hours a day over the summer, this could cost an additional £94.

“We often associate higher energy bills with the winter months, but as this heatwave continues to make its way across the UK, those relying on an air conditioning unit to keep the house cool may be in for a serious shock," said Peter Earl, head of energy at comparethemarket.com

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On Wednesday Britain basked in the hottest day in June since 1976. With temperatures hitting 34.6 degrees celsius, City workers were up and down like jack-in-a-boxes, going back and forth to the water cooler.

And while mercury levels have fallen back in the last 24 hours, the last time Britain saw such temperatures forest fires broke out, crops failed and the country came under attack from a swarm of ladybirds. So it may not be long until people are reaching for the air-con button.

Earl added: "People looking to avoid racking up hundreds of pounds in energy bills this summer would do well to review their energy provider to see if they are paying over the odds for their electricity."

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