General Election 2017: These are the top five strangest “facts” about today's vote

 
Caroline Blennerhassett
BRITAIN-POLITICS-VOTE-LABOUR
Jeremy Corbyn most Googled candidate (Source: Getty)

Voting commenced across the country today, and there's just hours until what's been a protracted and at times dramatic campaign comes to an end.

As well as the usual polling data that's churned out in the run-up to an election, we’ve been sent a variety of weird and wonderful statistics relating to the vote.

Here are five of the best 'facts' we've learned over the past few weeks:

1. Corbyn is the most searched political leader online

Forget the polls: Captify, an advertising technology company which analyses 33bn searches a month, reveals that Jeremy Corbyn was the most searched for political leader online. The Labour leader was the subject of 50 per cent of searches last week, followed by Theresa May at 36 per cent.

Tim Farron saw the biggest uplift in searches from April to May 2017 with a 7.2 per cent increase, while the PM experienced a 16.8 per cent decline in searches, the biggest decline in online searches of any political leader in the month of May.

Labour’s manifesto was also disclosed to be the most searched for online since the election was called.

2. Britons say TV has the biggest impact on their vote

Three out of four British citizens aged 18 and up rank television as the biggest influence on their vote ahead of the General Election, according to communications agency The PR Office, whereas only nine per cent put social media as their preferred source of information.

“With television ranking so high, it will be interesting to see how the Prime Minister’s decision not to take part in television debates affects the overall result,"said Shimon Cohen, chairman, The PR Office.

BRITAIN-POLITICS-VOTE-DEBATE
Theresa May did not appear at the televised event (Source: Getty)

3. Aldi and Lidl shoppers want Conservative victory

If supermarkets were parliamentary seats, we would be looking at a majority government for the Conservatives, according to research by GlobalData.

It found that both Tesco and Sainsbury’s shoppers favour the Conservatives, but Labour is the strongest party with Morrisons and Asda.

Waitrose was shown to be the most blue of all the supermarkets with almost half of their shoppers intending to vote Tory, while Asda is where Labour enjoys its best performance with 41 per cent of the vote, according to the poll.

In 2010, both Aldi and Lidl were Labour strongholds, but the Tories have benefited from a sharp incline from Ukip, and shoppers at the German discounters now favour the Conservatives.

%age of consumers

Total

Tesco

Sainsbury's

Asda

Morrisons

Aldi

Waitrose

Lidl

Conservative

40.2

40.3

42.4

35.4

37.7

40.5

46.7

44.6

Labour

36.5

34.8

33.7

41.2

40.3

38.9

24.4

32.6

Lib Dem

8.4

7.6

10.6

8.6

8.4

5.3

15.6

7.6

UKIP

5.2

4.8

4.9

4.7

5.8

6.9

2.2

3.3

Green Party

3.0

3.4

3.8

1.9

2.1

2.3

6.7

1.

4. Over half of Britons don’t know who Tim Farron is

Tim Farron was elected as leader of the Lib Dems in July 2015 following Nick Clegg’s resignation, and he has spearheaded the party’s campaign in this year’s abrupt election. However, a survey by Opinium found that over 50 per cent of the 2,000 people asked couldn’t identify who the leader of the major political party is.

The shocking findings don’t end there: the research also illustrated that almost one in five people in Britain are unaware that Theresa May is the leader of the Conservative party and, even more worryingly, 20 per cent of Britons between 25 and 34 years old don’t know who the UK Prime Minister is.

Who is the leader of the Labour party?

British public

Jeremy Corbyn

79%

Don’t know

21%

5. Almost half of non-voters would vote if there was an online option

Millions of UK citizens will bypass voting in the general election tomorrow but research has found that 42 per cent of non-voters would be more likely to take part in the polls if an online option was available. Londoners were the biggest supporters of online voting with some 68 per cent claiming they would be more likely to vote via the internet.

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