Gatwick Airport's plan to become carbon neutral has taken off and it now uses 100 per cent renewable energy

 
Rebecca Smith
The airport has been rolling out measures including an electric car-sharing service to help reach its goal
The airport has been rolling out measures including an electric car-sharing service to help reach its goal (Source: Gatwick)

Gatwick Airport has become carbon neutral, saying it now uses 100 per cent renewable energy as part of its efforts to offset ground fuel emissions.

The airport said it had been given the nod by ACI Europe, so all ground operation emissions the airport controls, including fuels, electricity and business travel, have been assessed.

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Gatwick has also published its progress against the targets it set itself for the 10 years from 2010 to 2020, noting a five per cent reduction in annual carbon emissions from fuel and energy, as well as a 2.6 per cent drop in annual energy consumption per passenger. It planned to cut its carbon footprint in half by 2020.

The airport has unveiled a range of measures in recent months to help it develop more sustainably, spanning a partnership with Airport Taxis to bring Tesla electric taxis to Gatwick, and a new waste processing plant. In October, it also announced a partnership with electric car-sharing firm Bluecity, with a new electric point-to-point car sharing service being rolled out at the airport.

Stewart Wingate, Gatwick's chief executive, said:

We consider sustainability as critical to our future as a successful airport and the news that we are now a carbon neutral airport shows just how far we have come since independent ownership in 2009.

We want to become the most sustainable airport in the UK and I would like to thank all the staff on the airport who have helped to get us this far.

Earlier this month, the airport announced it was pushing ahead with growth plans with £240m investment set for the year ahead.

It has awarded an airport planning services framework to Arup, Atkins and Jacobs, to help with capacity assessments and enable Gatwick to work out how to plan growth from "clever use of infrastructure, technology and efficient processes", as its plans for expansion were hindered when Heathrow got the go-ahead for expansion over Gatwick back in October.

Read more: Gatwick plans to ramp up growth despite no go-ahead on runway expansion

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