Apple and Nokia are best friends again after settling a patent lawsuit

 
Lynsey Barber
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Apple and Nokia could partner on digital health (Source: Getty)

The patent wars are over... between Apple and Nokia, at least.

A fresh fight between the two tech companies which kicked off late last year has come to an end after they agreed to settle a lawsuit over patents and a new licensing deal – even hinting at Apple's ambitions in digital health too.

"This is a meaningful agreement between Nokia and Apple," said Nokia's chief legal officer, Maria Varsellona.

Read more: HMD talks bringing back the Nokia 3310. Could other classics be next?

"It moves our relationship with Apple from being adversaries in court to business partners working for the benefit of our customers."

Shares in Nokia were boosted by more than five per cent on the Helsinki Stock Exchange following the announcement.

The new deal means Nokia-owned Withings' health tracking accessories are now back in Apple stores, online and in real life. And they're even considering working together on digital health products – an interesting move after it was recently and quietly revealed it bought a European startup dubbed "fitbit for sleep".

"We are pleased with this resolution of our dispute and we look forward to expanding our business relationship with Nokia," said Apple operating chief, Jeff Williams.

Read more: Apple's quietly bought a startup with ambitions to be a "Fitbit for sleep"

Details of the agreement have not been revealed but the Finnish firm said it will receive an up-front cash payment from Apple and additional revenues for the duration of the agreement which will come in from the second quarter of this year.

Apple in December filed a lawsuit in the US accusing Nokia of unfair tactics over patent licences which Nokia swiftly countered with its own suit in Germany accusing Apple of infringing patents.

Apple is embroiled in a separate legal row with chip-maker Qualcomm over royalties, which has resurrected fears of years-long smartphone patent wars.

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