Acclaimed boffin invents bike helmet that folds in half and fits into a small bag

 
Oliver Gill
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Morpher hopes by making helmets more easy to carry, more people will be persuaded wear them when cycling (Source: Morpher)

An acclaimed inventor who escaped a near-death cycling experience has invented a shrinking cycle helmet that can be fitted into a small bag or case.

Two-time British Inventor of the Year Jeff Woolf has worked with start-up Morpher to develop the helmet that folds in half while meeting all the necessary safety standards.

The pairing hope it will encourage the 83 per cent of people who don't wear a helmet because it is too cumbersome, to do so.

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With increasing numbers of Londoners taking to two wheels to pedal around the streets of the capital, the Royal Society for the Prevention of Accidents (RoSPA) has warned 75 per cent of cyclist fatalities in the UK were from serious head injuries.

“The goal is to get people to carry a Morpher in their bags, it will become a habit: habit that will save lives,” said Woolf.

​Morpher has raised £510,000 through a Seedrs campaign and is inching towards its target of £600,000. The firm reckons the idea has a pre-money valuation of £4.5m

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Woolf added: “The launch of the Seedrs campaign and the incredible response to Morpher so far means that I am now close to fulfilling my dream of getting as many people as possible to find it easy to carry a bike helmet. If we save even one life because someone is wearing a Morpher Helmet then it will all have been worth it."

Morpher said its helmet has patents granted in many countries, pending in several others.

It has the CE1078 and CPSC safety certification and is manufactured by one of the world’s leading helmet manufacturers who also produce for big name brand cycle helmets such as Bell, Giro, Scott, Lazer, Specialized, Bolle, Kali, POC, Trek and Limar.

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