Posh at the Pleasance Theatre review: Laura Wade's play is still excellent, but the treatment should have been more daring

 
Melissa York
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The all-female cast of Posh
Posh
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Girls for now, girls for later, yah?” It’s one of the most devastating lines in the original production of Posh, dripping from the lips of an over-privileged young aristocrat who divides women neatly into upper class ones fit to bear his children and lower class ones fit for nothing but a quick shag.

For Posh, a play that makes us privy to a dinner of Oxford University’s Riot Club – based on the Bullingdon Club of which Boris Johnson and David Cameron were famously members – is just as much a deconstruction of masculinity as it is of class.

That’s what makes this all-female version such an enticing prospect. Let’s flip this right on its gender and uncover what privilege really means. Boys for now, boys for later, yah? Will it sound just as horrific or slightly absurd?

Read more: Queer British Art review at Tate Britain

Unfortunately, we never find out. For these aren’t female reimaginings of the characters, they’re replicas. Same names, even the same laddish body language. It’s the same old Posh with longer hair. Laura Wade’s excellent script ensures a witty, devastating night of theatre, but for fans of the original, this will feel like a missed opportunity.

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