Uber has released its first diversity report and the tech giant is 64 per cent male

 
Rebecca Smith
Chief executive Travis Kalanick said Uber would demonstrate its commitment to change through transparency
Chief executive Travis Kalanick said Uber would demonstrate its commitment to change through transparency (Source: Getty)

After a string of difficulties, including sexual discrimination claims, Uber has released its very first diversity report in an effort to improve public perception of the ride-hailing app.

Currently, the figures have the San Francisco giant down as a male-dominated firm (63.9 per cent of its global workforce are men), and nearly half of employees are white.

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Uber boss Travis Kalanick has acknowledged the firm has been "too slow" to publish the numbers; many Silicon Valley giants have been releasing similar reports annually for the past few years.

The stats show the company lagging behind many of them when it comes to women in leadership or technical roles.

Women make up 22 per cent of Uber's leadership team and 15 per cent of tech jobs, with the likes of Google, Apple, Facebook and Airbnb ahead in those aspects. At Apple, women account for 23 per cent of tech workers, and at Facebook 17 per cent.

Some 36 per cent of Uber's global employees are women; around in line with its peers.

Uber has released a breakdown of its workforce in a bid to show greater transparency
Uber has released a breakdown of its workforce in a bid to show greater transparency (Source: Uber)

"It’s no secret that we’re late to release these numbers," said Liane Hornsey, chief human resources officer. "And I’d like to thank our employees for their tenacity in arguing the case for greater transparency—because what you don’t measure, you can’t improve."

The company said it was taking steps to improve, noting 41 per cent of new employees last year were women; five per cent more than the proportion of women in its overall employee population.

Read more: Uber wants its new chief operating officer to be a woman

Uber said it was "ramping up" its presence at recruiting events and its outreach to historically black colleges and universities and Hispanic serving institutions.

The tech giant also said it will look to diversity and inclusion experts to get advice on improving and taking further action.

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