SNP leader and Scottish first minister Nicola Sturgeon blasted over "tin pot" referendum plan by Scottish Tories leader Ruth Davidson as Holyrood begins debating vote motion

 
Mark Sands
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Holyrood To Debate Call For Second Referendum
MSPs will vote on Sturgeon's referendum motion on Wednesday. (Source: Getty)

Scottish first minister Nicola Sturgeon has been accused of a “tin pot” approach to independence as Holyrood debates her call for a new referendum.

MSPs are expected to vote tomorrow in favour of a motion demanding a second vote, but Scottish Conservatives leader Ruth Davidson lambasted Sturgeon as debate opened today.

The Scottish National Party leader opened the debate by accusing Prime Minister Theresa May of rejecting all attempts to collaborate over Brexit planning, and claiming that May had ruled out EU Single Market membership “without any prior consultation with the devolved administrations”.

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However, Davidson accused Sturgeon of acting like “a big Tory did this and ran away”.

“It won't do first minister, take responsibility,” Davidson said, accusing the SNP leader of wanting to unilaterally decide on both the rules and timing of the referendum.

“I remind the SNP today that they once described the last referendum – with the Edinburgh Agreement – unanimous backing in this chamber and 92 per cent support across the public as the 'gold standard' approach,” Davidson said.

“This isn’t the gold standard – it’s a tin pot approach to the biggest decision we could ever be asked to make.”

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Sturgeon is hoping to schedule a referendum between Autumn 2018 and Spring 2019, although May has already declared that “now is not the time” for such a vote.

Although Sturgeon leads a minority administration in Holyrood, her motion in favour of a referendum is likely to pass tomorrow thanks to the support of the Scottish Green party.

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