You can now choose genders other than man or woman on Tinder as it seeks to become more inclusive

 
Rebecca Smith
Tinder's update is to show
Tinder's update is to show "everyone is welcome" on the platform

Tinder has announced its newest update which allows users to opt for a gender identity other than man or woman.

From its launch back in 2012 up until today, the app only offered users two options when selecting their gender: man or woman. For those who identified as transgender or between or outside the gender binary, that posed a challenge.

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Tinder chief executive Sean Rad said: "Our goal is to provide a product that gives our transgender and gender non-conforming users a better experience on Tinder. We're really excited about the update and believe it is the right step to take as a company and create more meaningful connections between all of our users. Everyone is welcome on Tinder."

The app teamed up with LGBT+ organisation GLAAD in the US, and transgender advocate and consultant Andrea James to help develop the update.

How Tinder's update looks
How Tinder's update looks (Source: Tinder)

"It sends a strong message of acceptance when a platform like Tinder clearly tells its users that transgender people are welcome," said Nick Adams, director of GLAAD's Transgender Media Programme. "This update reflects a growing awareness that trans people are part of the fabric of everyday life, which in turn, accelerates acceptance for transgender and gender non-conforming people."

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The update will be available for users across the UK, US and Canada.

Tinder is the latest company to branch out in this area. Earlier this month, Metro Bank announced it was now giving customers the option to choose a non-binary prefix "Mx" on forms, as well as Mr or Mrs.

The lender said the option will be available to customers opening products like current accounts, as well as to staff.

"Sometimes there are issues that are too difficult to do something about, but this one was definitely not one of them," said Metro Bank's chief people officer Danny Harmer.

"I think a lot of organisations get tied up in finding reasons not to do things and worrying about how it might be misinterpreted."

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