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No delays on Brexit, warns Prime Minister Theresa May

Mark Sands
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The Conservative Party Conference 2016 - Day One
May was addressing Conservatives on the first day of the party conference in Birmingham. (Source: Getty)

Theresa May has vowed that there can be no delays on the UK’s departure from the European Union, blasting efforts to secure parliamentary oversight for the process as “undemocratic”.

May accused campaigners seeking a vote in parliament of trying to “kill” the UK’s referendum verdict.

Speaking at the Conservative party conference in Birmingham, May also reiterated her promises of a “great repeal bill” in the next Queen’s Speech, and to trigger Article 50 by the end of next March.

Read more: Brexit bargaining begins ahead of Conservative Party conference

“Those people who argue that Article 50 can only be triggered after agreement in both houses of parliament are not standing up for democracy. They’re trying to subvert it,” she said.

“They’re not trying to get Brexit right, they’re trying to kill it by delaying it.”

May also vowed to keep the United Kingdom together, stating the UK as a whole would leave the EU.

“There is no opt-out from Brexit, and I will never allow divisive nationalist to undermine the precious union between the four nations of our United Kingdom,” May said.

The comments will come as a direct attack on the hopes of Scottish first minister Nicola Sturgeon, who has repeatedly vowed that she will try to secure Single Market membership for Scotland in the aftermath of Brexit.

Read more: Brexit negotiations will cost UK £1 per person

Sturgeon has already responded furiously, arguing that May is ignoring the voices of Scottish voters.

And May also gave her predecessor, David Cameron, fulsome praise. “He has a legacy of which he - and our whole party - can be proud,” she said.

However, discussing her own negotiations with the EU, may also dished out some coded criticism of Cameron’s talks in Europe ahead of the referendum

“History is detailed with negotiations that failed when the interlocutors predicted the outcome in detail and in advance,” May said.

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