Jeremy Corbyn is to demand an end to "trench warfare" within Labour

Mark Sands
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Corbyn secured a resounding victory in Labour's leadership election last week (Source: Getty)

Jeremy Corbyn will tomorrow tell Labour members to end “trench warfare” within the party, warning of the risks of an early general election.

Addressing the Labour party conference in Liverpool, Corbyn is expected to demand MPs and party members rally around his leadership and focus on fighting the Conservatives.

It comes at the end of a conference which has seen senior Labour MPs, including former party leader Ed Miliband, call on supporters to unite behind Corbyn.

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“The central task for the whole Labour Party is to rebuild trust and support to win the next general election and form the next government. That is the government I am determined to lead, to win power to change Britain for the better.

“But every one of us knows that we will only get there if we accept the decision of the members, end the trench warfare and work together to take on the Tories,” Corbyn is expected to say.

“Whatever the Prime Minister says about snap elections, there is every chance that Theresa May will cut and run for an early election,” he will add.

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Corbyn will also use his speech to launch a list of 10 policy pledges, focusing on areas including the NHS, a National Education Services and inequality.

“Those pledges, the platform on which I was re-elected leader, will now form the framework for what Labour will campaign for - and what a Labour government will do,” he will say.

“Together they show the direction of change we are determined to take – and the outline of the programme that will take Labour into the general election.”

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