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Twitter explodes as David Miliband says Jeremy Corbyn is unelectable

Helen Cahill
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David Miliband and Tony Blair
True love - David Milliband took on the internet today to defend New Labour (Source: Getty)

True love will never die.

David Miliband wrenched himself out of the political shadows today to defend Labour's centre-left values, and Twitter lost it.

Writing in the New Statesman, Miliband wrote: "The main charge against Jeremy Corbyn is not just that his strategy is undesirable because it makes the party unelectable. That is only half the story. The real issue is that his strategy makes the party unelectable ­because it is in many aspects undesirable.

"Now Labour sits a long way from power, even before boundary changes. The ultimate ignominy of not being able to organise our own party conference has been avoided, but we have not been further from power since the 1930s."

Read more: In quotes: Jeremy Corbyn's quite sarcastic Today programme appearance

Miliband - who was once in the offing to become Labour leader himself - railed against Corbyn's policies, saying nationalisation "cannot be the answer to everything" and an anti-austerity stance "cannot explain everything".

The Twitter trolls quickly left their underground dungeons and social media warfare began.

The attacks were varied, but a large number of the tweets amounted to: "HA! Remember when you lost an election to your younger brother?"

But there were plenty of nostalgic Blairites (also known as "Bitterites" to Corbyn's fans) on hand to defend their dream Labour leader.

https://twitter.com/loveandlumos/status/778862701049159680

And then there were those who just weren't taking the whole thing seriously.

The intervention from Miliband - now president of the International Rescue Committee - comes after polls closed in Labour's most recent leadership election (which has taken place roughly a year after its last leadership contest). Corbyn is widely expected to win, which many on the right of the party fear will spell out electoral oblivion for Labour.

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