More bad news on Fleet Street as Mirror publisher plans job cuts

 
William Turvill
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Trinity Mirror Launches New Daily Newspaper
The cuts come shortly after Trinity Mirror closed its new newspapers the New Day (Source: Getty)

More job losses are coming to Fleet Street as the national newspaper industry struggles with advertising revenue falls.

City A.M. understands up to 15 roles have been put at risk of redundancy across the Daily Mirror, Sunday Mirror and Sunday People.

In an email to staff, seen by City A.M., editor-in-chief Lloyd Embley said: "Due to the shortfall in advertising revenues and the pressure on circulation, we have been challenged to make significant cost savings across the business.

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"As part of this review, we find ourselves in the difficult position of examining our editorial costs.

"Sadly, this means we are having to look at all of our budgets, including staff. Please rest assured that we are exploring all options - with the absolute aim of keeping staff redundancies to a minimum.

"However, we will be placing some roles at risk. We have now started the consultation process and those who are potentially affected will be spoken to or contacted today."

City A.M. understands around nine editorial positions could go, with the rest of the roles being administrative.

News of the job losses comes shortly after publisher Trinity Mirror closed the New Day newspaper less than three months after launch.

Read more: Independent newspapers made £7m loss in year before closure

It has been a tough year on Fleet Street. The Independent and Independent on Sunday newspapers were closed in March, with around 100 jobs thought to have been lost.

The Guardian earlier this year set out plans to cut around 310 positions as it bids to break even.

And the Telegraph also made a round of cuts, first announced last month.

A Trinity Mirror spokesperson said: “Like all media companies, it is essential that we adapt to the changing industry and ensure we continue to operate efficiently and control costs. An unfortunate but necessary part of this work is identifying savings in editorial budgets, which will include some redundancies at the Mirror. We are now in consultation with those impacted.”