US Presidential Election 2016 polls: Hillary Clinton leads Donald Trump despite slip after Orlando shooting

 
James Nickerson
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Hillary Clinton Holds 'Corridor Of Opportunity' Town Hall In SC
Bookmakers think Clinton will win the election comprehensively (Source: Getty)

Democrat Hillary Clinton is a clear favourite to win the US presidential election, with a series of polls putting her ahead of rival Donald Trump.

While Clinton's lead took a slight hit last week with an Ipsos Mori poll after the Orlando shooting, putting her 10.7 points ahead (compared to 14.3 in the previous poll), she continues to lead in RealClear Politics' poll of polls.

Overall, Clinton is leading by nearly six points.

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"There’s no way to look at Trump’s national polling that avoids the grim reality that he is at a lower ebb than any general election candidate has hit in the last three elections," political commentator Dan McLaughlin wrote in the National Review last week.

And to add insult to injury, in a separate recent poll for the Washington Post, 70 per cent of respondents said they have an unfavourable impression of Trump.

A fear of the Republican establishment in the buildup to the GOP national convention was that picking Trump would be disastrous as he wouldn't be able to appeal to voters on the scale of Clinton. However, given his rivals have dropped out, he is the presumptive candidate and will battle Clinton for the presidency.

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With bookmakers Clinton is also still the clear favourite. Over the weekend William Hill cut its odds on her to take the White House, offering 2/7, down from 1/3.

Meanwhile in the US election race, Trump has said the US has to "look at [racial] profiling" as part of the country's response to the shooting in Orlando.

He's also broken ranks with some conservatives to support gun control measures that would result in banning gun purchases for individuals on terror watchlists or no-fly lists, a policy supported by Barack Obama and Clinton.

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