EU referendum: Remain campaign Britain Stronger in Europe says Vote Leave has made £111bn in spending commitments

 
James Nickerson
Follow James
Government Pledges Increase In NHS Funding
The NHS has become a battleground in the EU debate (Source: Getty)

The Remain campaign has hit out at the Leave campaign for more than £100bn in spending commitments it has made in the buildup to the vote in June.


In a report published this morning Britain Stronger in Europe said that Vote Leave have made £111bn in spending commitments, which is over ten times the net £10bn saving it claims could be made if the UK votes for Brexit.

Will Straw, Executive Director of Britain Stronger In Europe, said: "The Leave campaign has been exposed once again for promoting fantasy economics. There would be no saving and no tax cuts because our economy would be damaged by leaving."

Read more: Why the City of London will be better off if we leave the European Union

The report comes after leading Leave campaigners today claimed that they will cut VAT on fuel. Among other spending commitments are £18bn in health spending, as well as £2.9bn on hundreds of new schools.


Later today leader of the House of Commons Chris Grayling, another leading figure in Vote Leave, will warn of what a Remain vote will mean for the NHS.

"It would be EU rules to govern our skills system and even EU rules that would tell us how health services should work," he is expected to say.

Read more: European business leaders sign letter in support of EU

On the fuel duty, "the least wealthy are hit particularly hard," Michael Gove, Boris Johnson and Gisela Stuart wrote in the Sun.

"The poorest households spend three times more of their income on household energy bills than the richest households spend. As long as we are in the EU, we are not allowed to cut this tax.

"When we Vote Leave, we will be able to scrap this unfair and damaging tax. It isn't right that unelected bureaucrats in Brussels impose taxes on the poorest and elected British politicians can do nothing."

Chancellor George Osborne last night tweeted his dismay at the claims, stating it was more "fantasy economics".