Generation Z more wary of their potential bosses taking a look at their online profiles

 
Hayley Kirton
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Kids these days, they're all so concerned about their online persona (Source: Getty)

It may seem that kids these days spend all their time on social media but that's probably because they're carefully editing what they put on there.

Generation Z, particularly those aged 16-24, are more wary that a potential employer could be snooping on their online profile than workers in other age groups, a survey released today has found.

According to the study by CV-Library, three-quarters (75 per cent) of generation Z said they expected a future boss to type their name into a search engine before drawing up an employment contract, compared with an average across all age groups of just 63 per cent.

Meanwhile, more than four out of five (83 per cent) youngsters are careful about what photos they put online in case they should hinder their employment prospects in the future, compared with the average of 71 per cent.

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"As workers spend increasing amounts of time online both professionally and socially, it’s essential to recognise the importance of an online persona, and the influence it can hold," said Lee Biggins, founder and managing director of CV-Library. "Workers from generation Z have been born and bred into a culture of social media, so it’s unsurprising that they expect this to trickle through into every aspect of their lives, including the recruitment process."

By contrast, older workers are not nearly as wary about their online presence. Just 42 per cent of those aged over 55 expected to be searched for online by a potential employer, and only 63 per cent said they were cautious about what they posted online.

Biggins added: "While older generations may have more difficulty embracing this trend, the working world is changing and we can already see how many industries require new recruits to have a strong online presence; for example copywriters with their own blog or designers with their own websites stand themselves in good stead, and simply reinforce the importance of an online identity."

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