In the wake of crises at TalkTalk and VW, Mars and Snickers aim to bar reputational damage with recall

 
Stephan Shakespeare
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Mars Announces World-Wide Recall Of Chocolate Bars
Mars recalled bars in 55 countries around the world (Source: Getty)

As Mars and Snickers recall millions of chocolate bars, YouGov data indicates the early impact this has had on consumer perception of both brands, and what the incident means for the future strategies implemented by both companies.

A piece of plastic was found in a Snickers bar in Germany, leading to a mass recall across 55 countries. No other bars have been found to be contaminated as yet, but the chocolate giant’s reaction indicates how sensitive brands are to any brand reputation crisis, especially in the wake of VW and TalkTalk’s problems in the past year.

YouGov BrandIndex’s Buzz Score measures whether a respondent has heard anything positive or negative about a brand in the past two weeks. On this measure, the figures are quite alarming for Mars and Snickers.

A dramatic decrease has occurred since the recall was reported, with Mars dropping 23 points and Snickers experiencing a fall of 14 points, which underlines that the story clearly has piqued the interest of a solid number of consumers.

While product recalls are commonplace, Mars and Snickers will be particularly conscious of reputational damage and the possible irreversible impact such a story could have on its brand throughout its target markets.

So while the recall and destruction of the products themselves will cost the two companies in monetary terms, overall it is of more value to show the public they are on top of the issue.

This has been borne out by YouGov’s Reputation Score. On this front, the scores have not wavered too much, with the number for both at a similar level to before the production mishap.

However, in an already crowded sector, any transgression could very easily lead a customer to choose a rival next time they pop out to get a choccy treat. So while Mars and Snickers have been proactive, and taken quick action, they will still be concerned about any lingering doubts consumers might have. The signs are good that the public recognises this.

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