London mayoral election 2016: Labour mayoral candidate Sadiq Khan publishes his own tax returns after Conservative rival Zac Goldsmith revealed his earlier this week

 
Lauren Fedor
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Khan paid £16,557.40 in income tax last year (Source: Getty)

Labour mayoral candidate Sadiq Khan has published his personal tax returns, after his Conservative rival Zac Goldsmith revealed his own tax records earlier this week.

According to figures provided by Khan's campaign today, the MP for Tooting earned £61,401 as a member of parliament last year, and banked another £1,500 in media appearance fees.

He paid £16,557.40 in income tax, and another £4,168.56 in National Insurance Contributions (NIC) in the 2014-2015 tax year – for an effective tax rate of 33 per cent.

Khan's campaign published the mayoral candidate's tax records dating back to 2005-2006, when he was first elected as an MP.

Khan's tax bill pales in comparison to that of Goldsmith, who paid about 35 times as much tax as his Labour opponent last year.

READ MORE: Zac Goldsmith paid nearly £700k in taxes last year

Goldsmith paid almost £700,000 in taxes on income and capital gains, as well as National Insurance Contributions (NIC) last year, after earning £67,035 in 2014-2015 as an MP, and £1,506,530 in income from a family trust.

Goldsmith's campaign published the Conservative candidate's tax records since 2010 – when he was first elected as the MP for Richmond Park – on Monday. The records showed Goldsmith paid an average percentage rate of income tax of 46 per cent over the period.

READ MORE: Goldsmith and Khan to publish tax return

The candidates first committed to publishing their tax returns last week, after Goldsmith criticised for his previous "non dom" status.

Goldsmith inherited non-dom status from his billionaire father, Sir Jimmy Goldsmith, when the senior Goldsmith died in 1997. Goldsmith later gave up the privileged tax status – which allows some UK residents with foreign ties to limit the tax paid on earnings outside of Britain – before becoming an MP in 2010.

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