These 13 property developers will help TfL build its property empire - including British Land, Balfour Beatty, Land Securites, Berkeley, Redrow and Canary Wharf Group

 
Lynsey Barber
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Unused parts of Transport for London's network will be redeveloped (Source: Getty)

Transport for London has chosen 13 companies to help it build thousands of new homes on its unused land and generate billions of pounds of new revenue.

Canary Wharf Group, Land Securities, Balfour Beatty, Barrat Homes and Berkeley Group are among those chosen to develop 50 sites in to homes, offices and retail outlets across London.

TfL plans to generate £3.4bn from non-fare revenue by 2023. Locations in Nine Elms, Northwood and Parsons Green have already been identified from the potential 50 site for development.

Read more: Here's every single property owned by TfL

"The 300 acres of land we have announced for development is just the first wave," said TfL's director of commercial development Graeme Craig.

"We are currently reviewing our assets to see how many more sites we can develop, especially in outer London, to provide homes that Londoners can afford while also generating revenue that can be reinvested in the transport network. This framework marks a further major step forward in allowing us to work with leading private sector developers and housing associations on an important part of our portfolio.”

The chosen companies will not get to bid for work with TfL on the sites. They are:

  • Balfour Beatty
  • Barratt Development / London and Quadrant Housing Association (Consortium)
  • Berkeley Group
  • The British Land Company
  • Canary Wharf Group
  • Capital and Counties
  • U+I / Notting Hill Housing Group (Consortium)
  • Land Securities Group
  • Mace Limited / Peabody Trust / DV4 Limited (Consortium)
  • Mount Anvil Group Limited / Hyde Housing Association Limited
  • Redrow Homes
  • Stanhope / Mitsui Fudosan Company Limited
  • Taylor Wimpey

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