LinkedIn's Project Voyager: Finally, LinkedIn's app is getting a major makeover for mobile

 
Lynsey Barber
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LinkedIn said editing profiles will become easier (Source: Getty)

LinkedIn has made some major improvements to its mobile app designed to attract users who are increasingly turning to their smartphone over desktop computers to connect with contacts and find jobs.

Inspired by the popularity of messaging apps, LinkedIn's familiar inbox feature used for communicating with others on the professional network will now work as a messaging feature similar to Facebook' Messenger or Whatsapp.

"It's faster and more casual - people prefer it," said LinkedIn chief Jeff Weiner, unveiling the makeover, nicknamed Project Voyager, at the company's Talent Connect conference. "The inbox is out and messaging is in."

Editing profiles will become easier while mobile users will now be able to see the statistics about who's been viewing their profile which has previously only been available on desktop. These features will be brought together in a notification tab called "Me".

The main homepage news feed will also get a makeover, presenting better more relevant content, as will search results, while a "my networks" tab will house updates from connections.

The app will also integrate your online calendar and remind you to view the profile of the person you're meeting with, showing you things you have in common.

The app is currently in Beta and will be available in a few weeks, Weiner said, and will work across iOS, Android and as a web browser based app.

LinkedIn has launched a handful standalone apps, including for jobs and for self-published content, to reach its 380m users, half of whom access the site on mobile. It's the first major makeover focused on mobile first for the flagship LinkedIn app however, since it first launched in 2008.

Linkedin referrals and LinkedIn recruiters, two paid-for services aimed at recruiters will also be updated to better connect candidates and companies which are hiring.

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