Clarendon Works in Notting Hill: Inside W11’s quirkiest brick factory

Discover the definition of industrial chic in a smart neighbourhood in Notting Hill.
For tips on how to modernise industrial architecture in London, look no further than Clarendon Works. This Victorian brick-making factory is an iconic building in Notting Hill, with its cavernous proportions and red brick exterior. It’s also an impressively wide house, packing in over 4,000sqft of space, four bedrooms, three bathrooms and three living rooms.


Clarendon Works, Notting Hill, £8.5m

The Moreno:Massey studio was brought on board to turn this period building into a contemporary family house, a firm well-known for its work on luxury homes in west London. Modern additions include a Manhattan-loft style layout, a media room, an integral garage and a wine cellar that holds over 700 bottles.
Sources: Zoopla; TfL
AREA GUIDE
Local Area Prices: Notting Hill
DetachedSemiDetachedTerracedFlats
£8.297m£5.593m£3.391m£973,622
Transport
Time to Canary Wharf25 mins
Time to Liverpool Street18 mins
Nearest stationsNotting Hill
But for those looking for a touch of industrial chic, the sitting room’s exposed brickwork contrasts with plush furnishings and the original windows have been replaced with steel-framed ones by Victorian company Crittall Windows, whose work can also be seen at the Tower of London.


The sitting room’s exposed brickwork contrasts with plush furnishings


The wine cellar

“Clarendon Works is one of our more quirky and unusual listings,” says Miles Meacock, head of sales agent Strutt & Parker’s office in Notting Hill. “It’s not your typical W11 period property, but it’s definitely got the ‘wow’ factor. It’s attracting a variety of prospective buyers who tend to scour the whole of London looking for such unique property conversions.”
Situated on Clarendon Cross, a quiet street off Portland Road, it’s also close to the shopping and transport of Westbourne Grove and a short walk to Holland Park.
Call 020 3553 8177 or visit struttandparker.com

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