The rise of mobile: Three graphs that show why mobile browsing is king

 
Billy Ehrenberg
Follow Billy
Seven countries, Finland, Japan, Australia, Sweden, Denmark, Korea and the United States, have more than one subscription per person (Source: Getty)

Broadband use is up to 78 per cent in the OECD, with the UK 14th for wireless connections per 100 customers. But it is the mobile market that has really taken off, dwarfing other types of subscription in most countries.

Seven countries, Finland, Japan, Australia, Sweden, Denmark, Korea and the United States, have more than one subscription per person, with the total number of contracts up 11.9 per cent in the 34 nation group.

In the UK, 80 per cent of people are connected, two percentage points above the OECD average and ahead of Germany, Italy and France, but behind the United States Japan and Finland, in first place.

The number of UK broadband subscriptions rose by 1.8 per cent between December 2013 and June 2014, slightly above the OECD average. The fastest growing rate was for Luxembourg, where an extra 7.3 per cent of the population was connected.

When we look at subscriptions by technology, we can see that fixed broadband is dying. Wireless is the key, driven by smartphones: this chart from the OECD shows how small the proportion of terrestrial fixed wireless has become, especially compared to the rise of mobile.